Chicago Streetcars in Black-and-White, Part 6

CSL 2589 on Indiana private-right-of-way south of 130th Street.

CSL 2589 on Indiana private-right-of-way south of 130th Street.

This is the sixth installment in our ongoing series Chicago Streetcars in Black-and-White.   You can find the other five installments (and the others we have done in color) by typing “Chicago streetcars” in the search window for this blog.

We offer you another generous selection of classic photos by some of the greatest railfan photographers of all time. As always, clicking on each picture will bring up a larger version in your browser.

If you have interesting information to share about these locales, we look forward to hearing from you. When referring to individual photos, please use either the car number or image number.

I am continually amazed at how expert our readers are at identifying mystery locations. The information we provide comes generally from what’s written on the back of the print, and this may not always be totally correct. That’s where our eagle-eyed readers can help correct the historical record.

-David Sadowski

CSL 5702 at Archer-Rockwell Station (Carhouse). (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 5702 at Archer-Rockwell Station (Carhouse). (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 5710. Andre Kristopans says, "SB on Coles at 79th. Tracks curving to left were used by Windsor Park cars, 5710 will curve onto 79th to the right. Note that buildings on South Shore, a block to the right, are large brick apartment buildings, while the buildings on Coles are small wooden houses." (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 5710. Andre Kristopans says, “SB on Coles at 79th. Tracks curving to left were used by Windsor Park cars, 5710 will curve onto 79th to the right. Note that buildings on South Shore, a block to the right, are large brick apartment buildings, while the buildings on Coles are small wooden houses.” (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CTA 3250. According to Andre Kristopans, we are at the "70th St end of 69th carhouse." (Robert W. Gibson Photo)

CTA 3250. According to Andre Kristopans, we are at the “70th St end of 69th carhouse.” (Robert W. Gibson Photo)

CSL 1817 is westbound on Harrison having just crossed the Chicago River. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 1817 is westbound on Harrison having just crossed the Chicago River. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 5708 on the Hammond-Whiting-East Chicago route, which got cut back to the state line in 1940.

CSL 5708 on the Hammond-Whiting-East Chicago route, which got cut back to the state line in 1940.

CSL 3301 is westbound on 59th Street at Stewart, having just crossed under the Pennsy. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 3301 is westbound on 59th Street at Stewart, having just crossed under the Pennsy. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

Roy Benedict says, "The southbound car (CSL 2811) is passing in front of 12423 S. Michigan Avenue." Andre Krisotpans adds,"The filling station visible behind the car with the overhang burned down in 2013." (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

Roy Benedict says, “The southbound car (CSL 2811) is passing in front of 12423 S. Michigan Avenue.” Andre Krisotpans adds,”The filling station visible behind the car with the overhang burned down in 2013.” (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 2619 on Brandon private right-of-way near 123rd Street. Bob Lalich adds, "CSL 2619 in image 896 is about to cross a short bridge just south of 126th St. Note that it has just met and passed a NB car in the siding north of the bridge. There was another siding at 122nd St on the Brandon line. I find it remarkable that there were two passing sidings located a half mile apart in the wetlands between Hegewisch and the East Side." (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 2619 on Brandon private right-of-way near 123rd Street. Bob Lalich adds, “CSL 2619 in image 896 is about to cross a short bridge just south of 126th St. Note that it has just met and passed a NB car in the siding north of the bridge. There was another siding at 122nd St on the Brandon line. I find it remarkable that there were two passing sidings located a half mile apart in the wetlands between Hegewisch and the East Side.” (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 929 and 1077 are on Balmoral at Ravenswood, and we are looking east. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 929 and 1077 are on Balmoral at Ravenswood, and we are looking east. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 3251 and 3276 on 61st Street near State. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 3251 and 3276 on 61st Street near State. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 3320 on the 67-69-71 route, "crossing South Chicago Av on Anthony," according to Andre Kristopans. On the other hand, Bob Lalich says, "CSL 3320 is crossing South Chicago Ave on a very short street called Keefe Ave. which goes under the NYC/PRR elevation in a viaduct. Anthony runs parallel to the NYC/PRR elevation on the south."

CSL 3320 on the 67-69-71 route, “crossing South Chicago Av on Anthony,” according to Andre Kristopans. On the other hand, Bob Lalich says, “CSL 3320 is crossing South Chicago Ave on a very short street called Keefe Ave. which goes under the NYC/PRR elevation in a viaduct. Anthony runs parallel to the NYC/PRR elevation on the south.”

CSL 5708 is southbound on Exchange Avenue at 74th Street, running parallel to the Illinois Central electric suburban service (now the Metra Electric).

CSL 5708 is southbound on Exchange Avenue at 74th Street, running parallel to the Illinois Central electric suburban service (now the Metra Electric).

CSL 3280. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 3280. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 3266 is southbound on Blackstone just below the 60th Street terminal. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 3266 is southbound on Blackstone just below the 60th Street terminal. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 3193 is at Navy Pier on Grand Avenue east of the Outer Drive. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 3193 is at Navy Pier on Grand Avenue east of the Outer Drive. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 3095 is "NB turning off 21st onto Racine on Morgan-Racine-Sangamon route," according to Andre Kristopans. Note the horse-drawn wagon near the Par-A-Dise Klub at left.

CSL 3095 is “NB turning off 21st onto Racine on Morgan-Racine-Sangamon route,” according to
Andre Kristopans. Note the horse-drawn wagon near the Par-A-Dise Klub at left.

CSL 3061 on Elston at Lawrence.

CSL 3061 on Elston at Lawrence.

Roy Benedict says, "(CSL) cars 2602 and 2606 are meeting on 111th St. west of Morgan St. as confirmed by my onsite visit on May 25, 1996."

Roy Benedict says, “(CSL) cars 2602 and 2606 are meeting on 111th St. west of Morgan St. as confirmed by my onsite visit on May 25, 1996.”

CSL 2571 is "WB on 111th at Cottage Grove. Pullman plant showing thru trees," Andre Kristopans says.

CSL 2571 is “WB on 111th at Cottage Grove. Pullman plant showing thru trees,” Andre Kristopans says.

CSL 2518 in a wintery scene on Chicago's far south side. Andre Kristopans says, "probably Ewing/108th terminal. Definitely at end of line, definitely not Hegewisch." (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 2518 in a wintery scene on Chicago’s far south side. Andre Kristopans says, “probably Ewing/108th terminal. Definitely at end of line, definitely not
Hegewisch.” (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 2518 is southbound on the Brandon private right-of-way at the railroad crossing at 129th Street. Bob Lalich says, "CSL 2518 is crossing the PRR Calumet River RR." (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 2518 is southbound on the Brandon private right-of-way at the railroad crossing at 129th Street. Bob Lalich says, “CSL 2518 is crossing the PRR Calumet River RR.” (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 1802 is turning from Harrison onto Clinton. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 1802 is turning from Harrison onto Clinton. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 3258 is eastbound on Division at Pulaski. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 3258 is eastbound on Division at Pulaski. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 3251is southbound on State Street at 61st. The date is early 1948, shortly after the CTA takeover, as evidenced by the sign referring to the upcoming aldermanic election. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 3251is southbound on State Street at 61st. The date is early 1948, shortly after the CTA takeover, as evidenced by the sign referring to the upcoming aldermanic election. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 2802 is westbound on 119th Street. Andre Kristopans says, "a block or so west of Morgan, about where the new Salvation Army center now is. Looks like a State/Lake car in the far background at Morgan."

CSL 2802 is westbound on 119th Street. Andre Kristopans says, “a block or so west of Morgan, about where the new Salvation Army center now is. Looks like a State/Lake car in the far background at Morgan.”

CSL 2589 on Chicago's far south side. For some reason, "Keep to right" is scrawled on the back of the car. Andre Kristopans says, "2589 on Indiana crossing Calumet River at 132nd. This was a single track on what would be the NB lane, so the “keep to right” would have been to warn drivers that passing a SB car on left might not be a good idea." (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 2589 on Chicago’s far south side. For some reason, “Keep to right” is scrawled on the back of the car. Andre Kristopans says, “2589 on Indiana crossing Calumet River at 132nd. This was a single track on what would be the NB lane, so the “keep to right” would have been to warn drivers that passing a SB car on left might not be a good idea.” (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

A Trip to West Allis, 1956

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The liner notes that come with record albums are often perfunctory, giving very little information about what you’re listening to. But in the case of Side One of Railroad Record Club LP #35, the liner notes offer a wonderful description of what you hear when playing the record.

This recording was made in 1956, during the twilight years of Milwaukee’s streetcar system, on busy Route 10 going to West Allis. While the classic era of Milwaukee streetcars and trolley buses is long over, the city seems poised to start a new one, with plans for a “starter” streetcar line coming to fruition. You can read more about that effort here.

We wish we knew more about the author, identified as William F. Nedden, who must have been there for the ride, along with the reel-to-reel tape recorder that captured the long-gone sounds of Milwaukee streetcars in action.

We offered a complete Railroad Record Club discography in one of our earlier posts. As far as we know, this is the first complete listing of the 40 or so RRC recordings on the World Wide Web.

While we have yet to learn much about William F. Nedden, the good news is that this, and several other RRC LPs, have been transferred to Compact Discs and digitally remastered. You can find them in our Online Store.

Our intention is to hunt down copies of all these out-of-print public domain recordings and make them available to railfans once again after many years, and at reasonable prices. All discs come with the original liner notes such as you find here.

We will be adding several new titles in the near future. If you have copies of RRC discs that we do not have, such as RRC #23 (Pennsy Trolleys), drop us a line. We will transfer the audio to CD using the latest technology and return your original disc to you in good shape, along with a CD for your troubles.

The proceeds from the sale of these discs will be used to help offset the expense involved in running this web site, including our original research. In just over three months, we have made several hundred rare images available to you in high quality form. In our first 100 days, we received over 25,000 page views, so we must be doing something right. We can continue this work with your help and support. Donations are always welcome.

-David Sadowski

RAILROAD RECORD CLUB #35 LINER NOTES

MILWAUKEE AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORT

It is Sunday, April 29, 1956, a wet chilly and depressing day in Milwaukee. The once great Milwaukee electric interurban and streetcar system has withered away until only two streetcar lines and a few freight operations remain. Car 971, built by St. Louis in 1927, clanks up to the corner of 4th and Wells, holding down a run on the No. 10 Wells-West Allis line. By the time the recording equipment is set up, we are already at 31st and Wells, an area of stately old homes and towering trees arching over the street like a Gothic cathedral. The brakes are kicked off with their characteristic “wish,” and the 971 rumbles along to 33rd and Wells for a regular service stop. Our motorman announces the next stop, 35th Street, where one can transfer to the Rt. 35 trolley bus line. After the traffic lights change, the 971 grinds along to 37th Street where only the briefest of arterial stops is made.

Leaving 37th Street, the 971 whizzes past the electric company substation and onto a private right-of-way. The old car bumps and rolls over the specialwork of a crossing and a siding and all of a sudden we find ourselves roaring across the Menomonee River Valley on a high spindly trestle. In rapid succession, we whiz past the Miller Brewery, and over some light industry, the Menomonee River, and the Milwaukee Road tracks while in the distance can be seen the Transport Company’s Cold Spring Shops with only a few pieces of work equipment visible. After what seems like an eternity of being suspended in space, the 971 slides off the trestle and back onto solid ground again on the west side of the valley.

There are approximately six more blocks of street running left before the private right-of-way of the West Allis branch is reached at 52nd and Wells. As we once again experience the rumbling echo of the 971 off of the pavement, one service stop is made between the trestle and 32nd Street. With a certain degree of eagerness, our motorman glides up to the specialwork at 52nd and skillfully moves the car through a sharp curve to the left. Now on a private right-of-way that seems to literally run through people’s back yards, the 971 makes service stops at Wisconsin Avenue and Blue Mound Road. Leaving Blue Mound, our motorman raps the controller up to a full 8 points, and we sail along the eastern edge of Calvary Cemetery, gradually dropping downhill until the cemetery stop is made at the bottom of the hill.

As the brakes are kicked off, the 971 squeals around a sharp curve to the right and begins a stiff uphill climb to the Hawley Road station where a service stop is made. This part of the West Allis branch was always the cause of a broken heart after June 30, 1951, for on that date, interurban service into the downtown area on the Milwaukee Electric’s Rapid Transit was abandoned.

From 52nd to 68th Streets, the Rapid Transit line and the West Allis branch shared a magnificent 4 track right-of-way that featured catenary overhead, huge transmission towers straddling the tracks, and complete freedom from grade crossings. Another service stop is made at 62nd Street, and as we roar over the numerous bridges leading us to 68th Street, we can’t help but wish the interurban was still in business. As we near 68th, our tracks drop down to the street level, cross 68th, and come to a stop between the unused bridge abutments of the abandoned Rapid Transit line, which continues to the west.

We leave the 68th Street stop, and after a few blocks of devious twists and turns, we find ourselves heading due south toward our ultimate destination, 70th and Greenfield in “downtown” West Allis. Our tracks are running along the east side of South 70th Street, and as we roar over the Milwaukee Road tracks on a short bridge, the huge sprawling Allis-Chalmers plant looms up on the left. Sandwiched between the plant and the street, the 971 rockets along, seemingly oblivious to the consequences of its high (35 MPH) speed and makes one service stop before reaching the end of the line and comes to a rather anticlimactic stop. The lone passenger disembarks, the compressor furiously comes to life again, and our trip is over.

Early in the morning on Sunday, March 2, 1958, sister cars 995 and 975 made the last run of all time over the West Allis branch and the era of street car in Milwaukee vanished forever.

William F. Nedden, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

To read about preserved Milwaukee transit equipment, go here. Milwaukee streetcar 972, a sister to the 971 featured on the Railroad Record Club recording, is preserved at the Illinois Railway Museum, while car 846 is in operable condition on the East Troy Electric Railroad.

Chicago’s Pre-PCCs

CSL 7001 at Clark and Ridge in 1938. (M. D. McCarter Collection)

CSL 7001 at Clark and Ridge in 1938. (M. D. McCarter Collection)

The PCC (short for Presidents’ Conference Committee) streetcar has been in continuous use since 1936, a remarkable 79 years. It literally saved the North American streetcar from extinction, but its development took several years and it did not appear in a vacuum. The presidents of several transit companies banded together in 1929 to develop a new, modern streetcar that could compete with buses and automobiles. The first production PCCs were made in 1936, the last in 1952.

The Chicago Surface Lines played an important part in the PCC’s development. Chicago ultimately had 683 PCCs, the largest fleet purchased new by any city, but in actuality CSL had 785 modern cars in all. There were 100 Peter Witt streetcars built in 1929 by a combination of CSL, Brill, and Cummings Car Co., and two experimental pre-PCCs, 4001 (built by Pullman-Standard) and 7001 (Brill), which dated to 1934.

The Peter Witt car was developed by its namesake in Cleveland around 1914 and set the standard for streetcars for the next 20 years. (Chicago’s batch were also referred to as “sedans.”) During the late 1920s and early 1930s, there was a similar type of car known as the “Master Unit*” made by Brill (Pullman-owned Osgood-Bradley made a similar model called the “Electromobile.”)

In conjunction with the 1933-34 Chicago World’s Fair, also known as A Century of Progress, CSL commissioned two experimental streetcars, the 4001 and 7001, with advanced features. (You can read an excellent and very comprehensive history of those cars on the Hicks Car Works blog.)

Of the two cars, the 4001 was more radical in both design and construction, with a streamlined all-aluminum body, but probably the less successful of the two. Both were taken out of service in 1944.  The 4001 is the only pre-PCC car to survive, and is now preserved at the Illinois Railway Museum.  The 7001 was scrapped by CTA in 1959.

Ironically, the 7001, made by J. G. Brill, was closer to the eventual design of the PCC car, although ultimately Brill did not build any true PCCs. The company had a policy not to pay patent royalties to other companies, and refused to do so with PCC technology owned by the Transit Research Corp. (TRC).

In 1935, Capital Transit ordered 20 pre-PCC cars for Washington D. C. based on the design of car 7001, but shorter. The order was split between Brill and St. Louis Car Company. This was an important step, since these were more than simply experimental units. Car 1053 managed to survive the end of streetcar service in Washington DC in 1962, until September 28, 2003 when it was destroyed in a fire at the National Capital Trolley Museum in Maryland.

There were also two additional 1934 experimental cars, the PCC Model A and B, which were used for field testing. The Model A was built in 1929 by Twin Coach and purchased second-hand to test new components. It was tested in Brooklyn circa 1934-35 and was scrapped in 1939.

The streamlined Model B incorporated all the latest PCC developments and was tested in Chicago, arguably the first PCC car operated here. While in use in Brooklyn, the PCC Model B dewired and was involved in an accident with a truck after its brakes failed. This led to the brake systems being redesigned for the first PCCs. The Model B was kept in storage for some time, and although the front end was repaired, it was never again used in service and was scrapped in the early 1950s.

By 1936, the first production PCCs were ready to go and the first one was delivered to Brooklyn and Queens Transit on May 28, 1936. However, Pittsburgh Railways put the first PCC into scheduled public service in August.

Brill’s decision not to build true PCCs ultimately proved fatal. Their 1938-41 “Brilliner” was considered somewhat inferior to the PCC car and few were built. 30 single-ended cars went to Atlantic City, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Cincinnati, while 10 double-ended cars were built for Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Co., where they continued in service into the early 1980s.

These were the last streetcars made by Brill, who had once dominated the industry. Most PCCs were built by the St. Louis Car Company, with a smaller share from Pullman-Standard.

We hope that you will enjoy these pictures of these pre-PCC cars, the ones that laid the groundwork for the “car that fought back,” which continues to serve faithfully and well in a number of North American cities, and hopefully will continue to do so for a long time to come.

-David Sadowski

*According to History of the J. G. Brill Company by Debra Brill, page 173, the Master Unit model was officially introduced in January 1929:

“The idea was to produce standardized cars.  Both ends of the car were to be identical in construction.  Height and width of the car, size and number of windows, seat width and therefore aisle width were to be the same for every unit of a specific type.  The cars were offered in single-or double-truck, and single-or double-end style, with doors located at the ends or with a combination end door and center door.  Master Units could be constructed with steel or aluminum, the difference in weight being about 5,000 pounds.  Interestingly, the cars had curved lower sides very much like the curve used on the lower panels of the Kuhlman and Brill-built cars of a few years previously.  There was nothing patentable about the Master Unit: it was merely a standardized design.

To Brill’s disappointment, buyers did not appear in large numbers.  Only seventy-eight Master Units were built in all, with just two constructed exactly to Brill’s specifications.”

Here is an article about Scranton car 505, one of the last surviving Osgood-Bradley Safety Cars, also known as “Electromobiles,” now in the process of being restored at the Electric City Trolley Museum.  An Electromobile was also the last trolley to run in New York City.

Here is an interesting blog post about the effort to restore the 505.

Here is a video showing a model of an Electromobile:

As an added bonus, as streetcars prepare to return to service in Washington D. C., here are some vintage films showing a variety of streetcars in action, including both PCCs, the 1935 pre-PCCs, and even some older types:

Frank Hicks, of the excellent Hicks Car Works blog, writes:

Very nice job on the Pre-PCC post on your blog!  It’s a great post with some outstanding photos, and of course I appreciate the “plug” as well.

Several of the photos you posted I had never seen before.  The photo of the 4001 in service is really nice; shots of the car in regular use are really pretty rare.  It was quite the “hangar queen” when it was on the CSL.  And the Model B interior shot is fascinating!  I think I saw that rear-end shot somewhere once but I don’t know that I’d ever seen a photo of the car’s interior.  What I found most fascinating is that it appears the car was designed to have left-hand doors fitted in the middle, Boston style (and likely so that it could be used or tested out in Boston, as I think Boston is the only city that had PCCs with this feature).  Close examination of the interior shot shows an inset panel across from the center doors and I bet it was designed for doors to be put there if desired.  It would be interesting to know more about the Model B.  I’m not even sure whether it was set up for one-man or two-man service; the photo makes it clear that there was no conductor’s station forward of the center doors, like the CSL cars had, but it’s possible there was a conductor behind the motorman (I think this was how Brooklyn set up its PCC cars).  Or it could have just been a one-man car.

Anyway, thank you for posting these photos and for posting such large scans of them – fascinating stuff!

CTA Peter Witt 3330 on route 4. These cars were shifted to Cottage Grove from Clark-Wentworth in 1947 after postwar PCCs took over that line.

CTA Peter Witt 3330 on route 4. These cars were shifted to Cottage Grove from Clark-Wentworth in 1947 after postwar PCCs took over that line.

CTA 6282 unloads passengers in the early 1950s. Note the postwar Pullman PCC at rear.

CTA 6282 unloads passengers in the early 1950s. Note the postwar Pullman PCC at rear.

CSL 6300 on route 4 - Cottage Grove in the early CTA era.

CSL 6300 on route 4 – Cottage Grove in the early CTA era.

CSL "Sedan" 6299 on route 4 - Cottage Grove.

CSL “Sedan” 6299 on route 4 – Cottage Grove.

A unique lineup at the 1934 American Transit Association convention in Cleveland. From left, we have the PCC Model A; CSL 4001; CSL 7001, and the PCC Model B. (Krambles-Peterson Archive)

A unique lineup at the 1934 American Transit Association convention in Cleveland. From left, we have the PCC Model A; CSL 4001; CSL 7001, and the PCC Model B. (Krambles-Peterson Archive)

The PCC Model B at Navy Pier. (Chicago Architectural Photographing Co.)

The PCC Model B at Navy Pier. (Chicago Architectural Photographing Co.)

The PCC Model B being demonstrated at Navy Pier. (CSL Photo)

The PCC Model B being demonstrated at Navy Pier. (CSL Photo)

The PCC Model B interior. (Chicago Architectural Photographing Co.)

The PCC Model B interior. (Chicago Architectural Photographing Co.)

CSL 7001 under construction at the Brill plant in 1934.

CSL 7001 under construction at the Brill plant in 1934.

CSL 7001 under construction at the Brill plant in 1934.

CSL 7001 under construction at the Brill plant in 1934.

CSL 7001 on route 36 Broadway-State in 1934.

CSL 7001 on route 36 Broadway-State in 1934.

CSL 7001 at State and Van Buren in 1934.

CSL 7001 at State and Van Buren in 1934.

CSL 7001 at State and Chicago, in World's Fair service, at 9 am on August 29, 1934. (George Krambles Photo)

CSL 7001 at State and Chicago, in World’s Fair service, at 9 am on August 29, 1934. (George Krambles Photo)

CSL 4001 at South Shops on October 23, 1938. (George Krambles Photo)

CSL 4001 at South Shops on October 23, 1938. (George Krambles Photo)

CSL 4001, signed for route 4 Cottage Grove, at South Shops on October 23, 1938. (M. D. McCarter Collection)

CSL 4001, signed for route 4 Cottage Grove, at South Shops on October 23, 1938. (M. D. McCarter Collection)

CSL 4001 in service, probably around 1934.

CSL 4001 in service, probably around 1934.

CSL 4001 on route 22, Clark-Wentworth, probably in the late 1930s.

CSL 4001 on route 22, Clark-Wentworth, probably in the late 1930s.

CSL 4001, sporting a good sized dent, at South Shops. (CSL Photo)

CSL 4001, sporting a good sized dent, at South Shops. (CSL Photo)

CSL 4001 at Kedzie and Van Buren on May 13, 1946. By this time, the car had been out of service for two years. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

CSL 4001 at Kedzie and Van Buren on May 13, 1946. By this time, the car had been out of service for two years. (Joe L. Diaz Photo)

Capital Transit 1056, a product of the St. Louis Car Co., as it looked in 1935 when new.

Capital Transit 1056, a product of the St. Louis Car Co., as it looked in 1935 when new.

Car 7501, the only Baltimore "Brilliner," in August 1941. Note the so-called "tavern" doors. This car was a sample in anticipation of a larger order that never came. It ran in service from 1939 to 1956. (Jeffrey Winslow Photo)

Car 7501, the only Baltimore “Brilliner,” in August 1941. Note the so-called “tavern” doors. This car was a sample in anticipation of a larger order that never came. It ran in service from 1939 to 1956. (Jeffrey Winslow Photo)

A modern Baltimore "Peter Witt" streetcar, built by Brill in 1930, alongside a PCC, made in 1936 by St. Louis Car Company.

A modern Baltimore “Peter Witt” streetcar, built by Brill in 1930, alongside a PCC, made in 1936 by St. Louis Car Company.

DC Transit pre-PCC streamlined streetcar at the National Capital Trolley Museum in 1993. Part of a 20-car order in 1935, split between Brill and St Louis Car Company. This is a St. Louis Car Company product. Sadly this car was lost to a carbarn fire at the museum in 2003. (John Smatlak Photo)

DC Transit pre-PCC streamlined streetcar at the National Capital Trolley Museum in 1993. Part of a 20-car order in 1935, split between Brill and St Louis Car Company. This is a St. Louis Car Company product. Sadly this car was lost to a carbarn fire at the museum in 2003. (John Smatlak Photo)

1053 interior. (John Smatlak Photo)

1053 interior. (John Smatlak Photo)

1053 interior. (John Smatlak Photo)

1053 interior. (John Smatlak Photo)

Scranton Transit 508, an "Electromobile," was built by Osgood-Bradley Co in 1929. It was another attempt at a modern standardized streetcar in the pre-PCC era.

Scranton Transit 508, an “Electromobile,” was built by Osgood-Bradley Co in 1929. It was another attempt at a modern standardized streetcar in the pre-PCC era.

Baltimore Peter Witt 6146. Don's Rail Photos says it was "built by Brill in 1930 and retired in 1955." Sister car 6119 is at the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, while 6144 is at Seashore. These were some of the most modern cars around, prior to the PCCs.

Baltimore Peter Witt 6146. Don’s Rail Photos says it was “built by Brill in 1930 and retired in 1955.” Sister car 6119 is at the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, while 6144 is at Seashore. These were some of the most modern cars around, prior to the PCCs.

Baltimore Transit Company car 6105, shown here on route 15 - Ostend St., is one of the last modern streetcars built before PCCs took over the market. The sign on front says that September 7 will be the last day for 6 hour local rides. Perhaps that can help date the picture.

Baltimore Transit Company car 6105, shown here on route 15 – Ostend St., is one of the last modern streetcars built before PCCs took over the market. The sign on front says that September 7 will be the last day for 6 hour local rides. Perhaps that can help date the picture.

Indianapolis Railways 146, shown here on a special run in 1949, was a Brill "Master Unit" but appears very similar to the Baltimore Peter Witts. This car was built in 1933, one of the last streetcars built before the PCC era. Brill tried to sell street railways on standardized cars (hence the name "Master Units") but as you might expect, no two orders were identical.

Indianapolis Railways 146, shown here on a special run in 1949, was a Brill “Master Unit” but appears very similar to the Baltimore Peter Witts. This car was built in 1933, one of the last streetcars built before the PCC era. Brill tried to sell street railways on standardized cars (hence the name “Master Units”) but as you might expect, no two orders were identical.