Autumn Leaves

North Shore Line Silverliner 737 (at left) and "Greenliner" 767 (at right) prepare to leave the Milwaukee Terminal on May 24, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line Silverliner 737 (at left) and “Greenliner” 767 (at right) prepare to leave the Milwaukee Terminal on May 24, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

Seasons change and Fall is here. Today’s post features classic images from two excellent photographers, Robert A. Selle (1929-2013) and Charles L. Tauscher (1940-2017). Selle was a master of black-and-white photography, while Tauscher shot Kodachrome slides in his prime.

We spent a lot of time working these slides over in Photoshop, making them look their best for you. Some required a lot of cleaning.

Lastly, we have some interesting historical CTA documents to share. Going back to the original source can often shed light on past events.

Keep those cards and letters coming in, folks.

-David Sadowski

New Book Update

FYI we recently turned in a second draft of our upcoming book The North Shore Line to Arcadia Publishing. I am pleased to report that the book has been expanded to 160 pages (from 128), a 25% increase. A publication date of February 20, 2023 has been announced, and we will begin our pre-sale on November 20 of this year.

PS- You might also like our Trolley Dodger Facebook auxiliary, a private group that now has 974 members.

Our friend Kenneth Gear now has a Facebook group for the Railroad Record Club. If you enjoy listening to audio recordings of classic railroad trains, whether steam, electric, or diesel, you might consider joining.

Indiana Railroad cars 446, 737, and 68 in Indianapolis, IN on June 3, 1938.

Indiana Railroad cars 446, 737, and 68 in Indianapolis, IN on June 3, 1938.

FYI, we are in the process of assisting with the creation of a new Facebook group called Hoosier Traction, which will be formally announced in the near future.

The Hoosier Traction Facebook Group will celebrate electric transit in Indiana and the Midwest, and also support the activities of the annual Hoosier Traction Meet in Dayton, OH (although not affiliated with the North American Transit Historical Society, which organizes that event).

The North Shore Line (nearly all by Robert A. Selle)

North Shore Line car 162 is at the rear of a northbound train at Chicago Avenue on June 30, 1958. This car is now the oldest survivor of the fleet, and recently arrived at East Troy, where it will be restored. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 162 is at the rear of a northbound train at Chicago Avenue on June 30, 1958. This car is now the oldest survivor of the fleet, and recently arrived at East Troy, where it will be restored. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line tool car 234 (a former Merchandise Despatch car) at Edison Court in Waukegan on August 2, 1958. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line tool car 234 (a former Merchandise Despatch car) at Edison Court in Waukegan on August 2, 1958. (Robert Selle Photo)

A view of the abandoned Shore Line Route and the crossover to the Chicago Hardware Foundry Company in North Chicago in April 1956. (Robert Selle Photo)

A view of the abandoned Shore Line Route and the crossover to the Chicago Hardware Foundry Company in North Chicago in April 1956. (Robert Selle Photo)

A view of the abandoned Shore Line Route in North Chicago in April 1956. (Robert Selle Photo)

A view of the abandoned Shore Line Route in North Chicago in April 1956. (Robert Selle Photo)

A view of the abandoned Shore Line Route in North Chicago in April 1956. (Robert Selle Photo)

A view of the abandoned Shore Line Route in North Chicago in April 1956. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line caboose 1005 at North Chicago in June, 1939. (Richard J. Anderson Photo)

North Shore Line caboose 1005 at North Chicago in June, 1939. (Richard J. Anderson Photo)

North Shore Line caboose 1004 at North Chicago on September 17, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line caboose 1004 at North Chicago on September 17, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

Former North Shore Line Merchandise Despatch car 213 at North Chicago (Chicago Hardware Foundry Company) on August 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

Former North Shore Line Merchandise Despatch car 213 at North Chicago (Chicago Hardware Foundry Company) on August 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

Newly painted North Shore Line caboose 1003 at North Chicago on January 19, 1957. (Robert Selle Photo)

Newly painted North Shore Line caboose 1003 at North Chicago on January 19, 1957. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line caboose 1002 at North Chicago on January 19, 1957. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line caboose 1002 at North Chicago on January 19, 1957. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 419 is at the Highwood Shops on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 419 is at the Highwood Shops on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 444 at the Highwood Shops on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 444 at the Highwood Shops on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 169 in Mundelein on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 169 in Mundelein on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 735 is at the Mundelein Yards on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 735 is at the Mundelein Yards on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 150 is on the rear end of a northbound train at Chicago Avenue on June 3, 1959. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 150 is on the rear end of a northbound train at Chicago Avenue on June 3, 1959. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line diner/lounge car 417 is at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line diner/lounge car 417 is at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line Silverliner 764 is on a side track at Edison Court in Waukegan on July 26, 1958. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line Silverliner 764 is on a side track at Edison Court in Waukegan on July 26, 1958. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 169 is on a side track at Edison Court in Waukegan on July 9, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 169 is on a side track at Edison Court in Waukegan on July 9, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 190, which had recently been damaged by fire, at the Highwood Shops on August 27, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 190, which had recently been damaged by fire, at the Highwood Shops on August 27, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line steeple cab loco 452 (with 453 at left) at Great Lakes Naval Station, on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line steeple cab loco 452 (with 453 at left) at Great Lakes Naval Station, on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line loco 459 at the Pettibone Shops in North Chicago on October 23, 1954. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line loco 459 at the Pettibone Shops in North Chicago on October 23, 1954. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line tool car 234 at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line tool car 234 at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line line car 606 at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line line car 606 at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line line car 604 at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line line car 604 at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

Chicago Transit Authority Buses by Charles L. Tauscher

CTA trolley bus 9410 is westbound on Montrose Avenue in June 1961. Note the late 1940s Jeepster at left, and the mid-50s Chevy at right. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9410 is westbound on Montrose Avenue in June 1961. Note the late 1940s Jeepster at left, and the mid-50s Chevy at right. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9341 is southbound on Central Avenue at North Avenue in August 1965, at a time when a White Castle hamburger cost just 12 cents. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9341 is southbound on Central Avenue at North Avenue in August 1965, at a time when a White Castle hamburger cost just 12 cents. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

The same location in 2019. There is still a White Castle on the corner, off to the left, but the building in the previous photo has been replaced by a newer one just out of view.

The same location in 2019. There is still a White Castle on the corner, off to the left, but the building in the previous photo has been replaced by a newer one just out of view.

CTA trolley bus 9287 is turning from North Avenue onto Narragansett Avenue in September 1962, so it can go into the off-street loop. It's possible that the man on the corner looking down may be the late William C. Hoffman. The Terminal Grill is long gone, but this loop is still used by CTA buses. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9287 is turning from North Avenue onto Narragansett Avenue in September 1962, so it can go into the off-street loop. It’s possible that the man on the corner looking down may be the late William C. Hoffman. The Terminal Grill is long gone, but this loop is still used by CTA buses.
(Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

The same location in 2021. A Dunkin Donuts has replaced the diner grill. Midas Muffler is still there, down the street at the corner of North Avenue and Ridgeland Avenue in Oak Park. The off-street loop is in Chicago.

The same location in 2021. A Dunkin Donuts has replaced the diner grill. Midas Muffler is still there, down the street at the corner of North Avenue and Ridgeland Avenue in Oak Park. The off-street loop is in Chicago.

CTA 9746 at an unidentified location in April 1963. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9746 at an unidentified location in April 1963. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9502 is southbound on Central Avenue at Bloomingdale (1800 N.) in 1969. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9502 is southbound on Central Avenue at Bloomingdale (1800 N.) in 1969. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

The same location today. The bridge has been replaced since the previous photo.

The same location today. The bridge has been replaced since the previous photo.

This is most likely CTA trolley bus 9631 on the April 1, 1973 Omnibus Society of America fantrip that closed out trolley bus service in Chicago. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

This is most likely CTA trolley bus 9631 on the April 1, 1973 Omnibus Society of America fantrip that closed out trolley bus service in Chicago. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9761 in 1973. This may be on a fantrip. I'm thinking the location may be at Belmont and Kimball, but the side sign says Montrose. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9761 in 1973. This may be on a fantrip. I’m thinking the location may be at Belmont and Kimball, but the side sign says Montrose. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9761 on a 1973 fantrip. Can this be somewhere along Belmont Avenue? (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9761 on a 1973 fantrip. Can this be somewhere along Belmont Avenue? (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9761 at an unidentified location on a 1973 fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9761 at an unidentified location on a 1973 fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley buses in dead storage some time after the end of service in 1973. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley buses in dead storage some time after the end of service in 1973. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9325 is westbound on Irving Park Road in September 1968. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9325 is westbound on Irving Park Road in September 1968. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9708 at an unidentified location in August 1965. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9708 at an unidentified location in August 1965. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9708 at an unidentified location in August 1965. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9708 at an unidentified location in August 1965. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9761 is signed for Route 80 - Irving Park Road in 1969, but the actual location seems to be Central Avenue not far south from Fullerton, so this may be a fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9761 is signed for Route 80 – Irving Park Road in 1969, but the actual location seems to be Central Avenue not far south from Fullerton, so this may be a fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9545 is signed for 47th Street in August 1965. Not sure of the actual location, however. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9545 is signed for 47th Street in August 1965. Not sure of the actual location, however. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9308 has just crossed over the Chicago River on North Avenue on May 15, 1962. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9308 has just crossed over the Chicago River on North Avenue on May 15, 1962. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 2583 is westbound on 103rd Street at Vincennes Avenue in May 1960. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 2583 is westbound on 103rd Street at Vincennes Avenue in May 1960. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9300 is southbound on Central Avenue in July 1969. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9300 is southbound on Central Avenue in July 1969. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

We can infer from this July 1968 photo that CTA trolley bus 9537 could not go through the northbound side of the viaduct under the Chicago and North Western tracks on Central Avenue at Lake Street. There must have been some sort of obstruction. The bus is being pushed so that it can get back to the northbound side of the street where it can be re-wired. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

We can infer from this July 1968 photo that CTA trolley bus 9537 could not go through the northbound side of the viaduct under the Chicago and North Western tracks on Central Avenue at Lake Street. There must have been some sort of obstruction. The bus is being pushed so that it can get back to the northbound side of the street where it can be re-wired. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9761 is northbound at Central Avenue at North Avenue on a 1973 fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9761 is northbound at Central Avenue at North Avenue on a 1973 fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9761 is northbound at Central Avenue at North Avenue on a 1973 fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9761 is northbound at Central Avenue at North Avenue on a 1973 fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9670 and 3534 are at an unidentified location in June 1961. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9670 and 3534 are at an unidentified location in June 1961. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9670 and 3534 are at an unidentified location in June 1961. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9670 and 3534 are at an unidentified location in June 1961. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 3534 and 9389 are at Irving Park Road and Neenah in June 1961. This off-street loop was as far west as trolley buses went on Irving Park. This loop was later decommissioned and part of it is now used as a private driveway. 3534 is on a fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 3534 and 9389 are at Irving Park Road and Neenah in June 1961. This off-street loop was as far west as trolley buses went on Irving Park. This loop was later decommissioned and part of it is now used as a private driveway. 3534 is on a fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 3534 and 9389 are at Irving Park Road and Neenah in June 1961. This off-street loop was as far west as trolley buses went on Irving Park. This loop was later decommissioned and part of it is now used as a private driveway. 3534 is on a fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 3534 and 9389 are at Irving Park Road and Neenah in June 1961. This off-street loop was as far west as trolley buses went on Irving Park. This loop was later decommissioned and part of it is now used as a private driveway. 3534 is on a fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

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Historical CTA Documents

Who can say why some things are kept, while others are destroyed? These historical documents form a paper trail that helps inform our understanding of the past.

Mystery CERA Document

In 2014, I compiled a data disc made up of the first 76 Central Electric Railfans’ Association Bulletins from 1938-47. I recently came across an early document that I had not seen before. Curiously, it is not one of the numbered bulletins, but is called “Circular 115.” Which gives rise to the question, were there really 114 previous circulars issued in the three years prior to this one? And if so, where are they and what happened to them?

Please note that the Trolley Dodger is not affiliated with Central Electric Railfans’ Association.

New Compact Disc, Now Available:

CTA-1
The Last Chicago Streetcars 1958
# of Discs – 1
Price: $15.99

Until now, it seemed as though audio recordings of Chicago streetcars were practically non-existent. For whatever reason, the late William A. Steventon does not appear to have made any for his Railroad Record Club, even though he did make other recordings in the Chicago area in 1956.

Now, audio recordings of the last runs of Chicago streetcars have been found, in the collections of the late Jeffrey L. Wien (who was one of the riders on that last car). We do not know who made these recordings, but this must have been done using a portable reel-to-reel machine.

These important recordings will finally fill a gap in transit history. The last Chicago Transit Authority streetcar finished its run in the early hours of June 21, 1958. Now you can experience these events just as Chicagoans did.

As a bonus, we have included Keeping Pace, a 1939 Chicago Surface Lines employee training program. This was digitally transferred from an original 16” transcription disc. These recordings were unheard for 80 years.

Total time – 74:38

Chicago’s Lost “L”s Online Presentation

We recently gave an online presentation about our book Chicago’s Lost “L”s for the Chicago Public Library, as part of their One Book, One Chicago series. You can watch it online by following this link.

The Trolley Dodger On the Air

We appeared on the Dave Plier Show on WGN radio on July 16, 2021, to discuss Chicago’s Lost “L”s. You can hear that discussion here.

Our Latest Book, Now Available:

Chicago’s Lost “L”s

From the back cover:

Chicago’s system of elevated railways, known locally as the “L,” has run continuously since 1892 and, like the city, has never stood still. It helped neighborhoods grow, brought their increasingly diverse populations together, and gave the famous Loop its name. But today’s system has changed radically over the years. Chicago’s Lost “L”s tells the story of former lines such as Garfield Park, Humboldt Park, Kenwood, Stockyards, Normal Park, Westchester, and Niles Center. It was once possible to take high-speed trains on the L directly to Aurora, Elgin, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The L started out as four different companies, two starting out using steam engines instead of electricity. Eventually, all four came together via the Union Loop. The L is more than a way of getting around. Its trains are a place where people meet and interact. Some say the best way to experience the city is via the L, with its second-story view. Chicago’s Lost “L”s is virtually a “secret history” of Chicago, and this is your ticket. David Sadowski grew up riding the L all over the city. He is the author of Chicago Trolleys and Building Chicago’s Subways and runs the online Trolley Dodger blog.

The Images of America series celebrates the history of neighborhoods, towns, and cities across the country. Using archival photographs, each title presents the distinctive stories from the past that shape the character of the community today. Arcadia is proud to play a part in the preservation of local heritage, making history available to all.

Title Chicago’s Lost “L”s
Images of America
Author David Sadowski
Edition illustrated
Publisher Arcadia Publishing (SC), 2021
ISBN 1467100007, 9781467100007
Length 128 pages

Chapters:
01. The South Side “L”
02. The Lake Street “L”
03. The Metropolitan “L”
04. The Northwestern “L”
05. The Union Loop
06. Lost Equipment
07. Lost Interurbans
08. Lost Terminals
09. Lost… and Found

Each copy purchased here will be signed by the author, and you will also receive a bonus facsimile of a 1926 Chicago Rapid Transit Company map, with interesting facts about the “L” on the reverse side.

The price of $23.99 includes shipping within the United States.

For Shipping to US Addresses:

For Shipping to Canada:

For Shipping Elsewhere:

Help Support The Trolley Dodger

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You can help us continue our original transit research by checking out the fine products in our Online Store.
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Getting Warmer

The conductor on this gate car, on a westbound Douglas Park train at Western Avenue, is waiting to receive the bell signal from the next car, so he can pass it along. Before "L" trains had door control wired up between cars, this is how the system worked. There were many more conductors-- a three car train of wooden "L" cars had two conductors, plus the motorman. The date was February 9, 1954. (William C. Hoffman Photo) Andre Kristopans: "One detail - each train had one motorman and one conductor. Conductor worked between first two cars (or in only car if there was only one). The rest of the men were classified as "guards" and had a slightly lower pay rate. Motorman and conductor stayed together all day, guards worked dependent on train length that trip. They were apparently mostly part timers that only worked the longer rush trains, though for instance on North-South where trains were four cars midday at least one guard worked all day."

The conductor on this gate car, on a westbound Douglas Park train at Western Avenue, is waiting to receive the bell signal from the next car, so he can pass it along. Before “L” trains had door control wired up between cars, this is how the system worked. There were many more conductors– a three car train of wooden “L” cars had two conductors, plus the motorman. The date was February 9, 1954. (William C. Hoffman Photo) Andre Kristopans: “One detail – each train had one motorman and one conductor. Conductor worked between first two cars (or in only car if there was only one). The rest of the men were classified as “guards” and had a slightly lower pay rate. Motorman and conductor stayed together all day, guards worked dependent on train length that trip. They were apparently mostly part timers that only worked the longer rush trains, though for instance on North-South where trains were four cars midday at least one guard worked all day.”

Spring is finally here, and the temps are gradually getting warmer. But here at the Trolley Dodger, we feel we’re getting warmer in other ways as well– in the sense that we’re on to something.

After more than six years, we’re getting closer to what I hoped this site could be when it started. Maybe we’re finally realizing some of our true potential, I don’t know. I will leave such determinations to our readers.

But when I started my first transit blog (this is actually the second), someone opined it was long on potential, and short on execution. And I had to agree that this was so. Hey, nobody knows everything about a subject, and we learn as we go along.

And in six plus years, I feel we have improved both the content of this site (our image library) and the information that we provide. And it does seem to fill a need that was out there. I base that on how often our own articles and pictures come up when I do Internet searches on subjects, and the number of times we see our own pictures re-shared on Facebook.

When folks do share our images on Facebook, though, there are a few things that I would ask. First, do not crop out the watermark on our images that identifies them as having come from here. Second, please provide the correct caption information. Too many times, I have seen either partial, or sometimes even incorrect captions placed on our photos when shared.

Finally, please credit the original photographer, when the name of that person is known.

Today, we have a large number of outstanding classic photos for your consideration. Even better, all of them are from our own collections. Some we purchased, and others are scans of original 35mm slides taken by the late William C. Hoffman.

We recently received the Hoffman collection as part of an overall gift of photographs collected and shot by the late Jeffrey L. Wein, a friend for over 40 years. We thank him for his generosity.

You may have seen duplicate slides over the years from some of these Hoffman shots. Bill Hoffman was an avid photographer, and while not always the best from a technical standpoint, he got many shots that are unique and were either missed, or overlooked, by others.

Bill Hoffman’s strong suit was in documenting things that were fast disappearing, those scenes of everyday life that others took for granted. While many of his pictures are not tack-sharp, at least here, we are working with the “best evidence,” the original slides themselves, and not duplicates.

I don’t know what kind of camera equipment he used back in the day, but after he passed away in the late 1980s, a friend gave me Bill Hoffman’s last camera, which was a screw-mount Leica IIIg, a model from 1957.

Meanwhile, after taking a pause due to the pandemic, work will soon resume on our next book Chicago’s Lost “L”s, scheduled to appear on July 12. It has now reached the proofing stage, and there are still a few changes that need to be made.

Arcadia Publishing has priced this at $23.99, and we are doing our best to make sure that you, the reader, will get an excellent value for your money. We will begin our pre-sale at the beginning of June, and each copy purchased from our Online Store will also include a bonus item, as well as being autographed.

Enjoy!

-David Sadowski

PS- If you want to see even more transit-related content than we can share here, check out our Trolley Dodger Facebook group, which currently has 242 members.

Recent Finds

CTA 3156, seen here on the Stock Yards branch in the early 1950s, was built by Brill in 1909 for the Lake Street "L". After it was no longer needed there, it was used on this shuttle operation in the early-to-mid 1950s, still sporting at least one trolley pole. I am not sure of the exact location here, but it is nearby Agar's Meats and on a section of "L" that was double-tracked. The men in the foreground were either on the roof of a nearby building, or perhaps on the Chicago Junction Railway embankment, if that was close by. (Wendell E. Grove Photo)

CTA 3156, seen here on the Stock Yards branch in the early 1950s, was built by Brill in 1909 for the Lake Street “L”. After it was no longer needed there, it was used on this shuttle operation in the early-to-mid 1950s, still sporting at least one trolley pole. I am not sure of the exact location here, but it is nearby Agar’s Meats and on a section of “L” that was double-tracked. The men in the foreground were either on the roof of a nearby building, or perhaps on the Chicago Junction Railway embankment, if that was close by. (Wendell E. Grove Photo)

On June 6, 1954, the National Railway Historical Society held a fantrip to say goodbye to trolley service on the Red Arrow interurban to West Chester, PA. Cars 14, 20, and 68 were used, and after 20 broke down, it was towed by 68. This was a photo stop, and the slide identifies the location as either "Milltown" or "Mill farm," the handwriting is hard to make out.

On June 6, 1954, the National Railway Historical Society held a fantrip to say goodbye to trolley service on the Red Arrow interurban to West Chester, PA. Cars 14, 20, and 68 were used, and after 20 broke down, it was towed by 68. This was a photo stop, and the slide identifies the location as either “Milltown” or “Mill farm,” the handwriting is hard to make out.

We actually ran another picture from the same photo stop in a previous post:

Cars 14, 20 and 68 at a photo stop along the West Chester line on the June 6, 1954 NRHS fantrip.

Cars 14, 20 and 68 at a photo stop along the West Chester line on the June 6, 1954 NRHS fantrip.

Red Arrow Brill-built "Master Unit" 77, signed for the Sharon Hill line, in the early 1950s. This car, built in 1932, has been preserved, but the last report I have is that it is stored inoperable by the Middletown and Hummelstown Railroad.

Red Arrow Brill-built “Master Unit” 77, signed for the Sharon Hill line, in the early 1950s. This car, built in 1932, has been preserved, but the last report I have is that it is stored inoperable by the Middletown and Hummelstown Railroad.

Ardmore junction was a favorite spot for photographers on the Red Arrow Lines, as the Norristown High-Speed Line crossed over the trolley line to Ardmore. Many photos such as this were posed on fantrips, up until the end of 1966, when buses replaced rail on the Ardmore branch. The date and circumstances of this photo are not known, other than that it was taken in 1961. Car 66 was built by Brill in 1927, and has been preserved at the Pennsylvania Trolley Museum since 1970.

Ardmore junction was a favorite spot for photographers on the Red Arrow Lines, as the Norristown High-Speed Line crossed over the trolley line to Ardmore. Many photos such as this were posed on fantrips, up until the end of 1966, when buses replaced rail on the Ardmore branch. The date and circumstances of this photo are not known, other than that it was taken in 1961. Car 66 was built by Brill in 1927, and has been preserved at the Pennsylvania Trolley Museum since 1970.

Over the years, Boston has phased out nearly all the street running on its Green Line trolley system, except for a bit of the E line, which now terminates at Heath. Here, on October 30, 1982, Clark Frazier captured this view of MBTA "picture window" PCC 3314, built by Pullman-Standard in 1951, on Huntington Avenue, going by Mission Park on its way to Arborway as part of a two-car train. Although service on the E line was truncated to Heath, trolleys still run at this location today.

Over the years, Boston has phased out nearly all the street running on its Green Line trolley system, except for a bit of the E line, which now terminates at Heath. Here, on October 30, 1982, Clark Frazier captured this view of MBTA “picture window” PCC 3314, built by Pullman-Standard in 1951, on Huntington Avenue, going by Mission Park on its way to Arborway as part of a two-car train. Although service on the E line was truncated to Heath, trolleys still run at this location today.

Here is a view of the Lake Street "L" looking north from Garfield Park in September 1963. This was a time between the elevation of the west portion of the line in 1962, and the arrival of the new 2000-series "L" cars in 1964. The line was operated using 4000s, which by then had their trolley poles removed, as Lake was now operated with third rail only. These cars are in mid-day storage on a third track. The following year, a new yard opened in Forest Park, making this kind of storage unnecessary.

Here is a view of the Lake Street “L” looking north from Garfield Park in September 1963. This was a time between the elevation of the west portion of the line in 1962, and the arrival of the new 2000-series “L” cars in 1964. The line was operated using 4000s, which by then had their trolley poles removed, as Lake was now operated with third rail only. These cars are in mid-day storage on a third track. The following year, a new yard opened in Forest Park, making this kind of storage unnecessary.

Johnstown, PA was the smallest city to operate PCC cars, and was a favorite of photographers, but I don't recall seeing a lot of winter pictures. Here, Johnstown Traction 412, with its distinctive Pepsi bottlecap advertising on the front, is at the Roxbury Loop on March 14, 1959. Streetcar service ended the following year. (Bill Volkmer Photo)

Johnstown, PA was the smallest city to operate PCC cars, and was a favorite of photographers, but I don’t recall seeing a lot of winter pictures. Here, Johnstown Traction 412, with its distinctive Pepsi bottlecap advertising on the front, is at the Roxbury Loop on March 14, 1959. Streetcar service ended the following year. (Bill Volkmer Photo)

Officials from Skokie and the CTA cut the ribbon at Dempster Street on April 20, 1964, inaugurating Skokie Swift service on file miles of trackage formerly owned by the North Shore Line interurban, which had quit service just over a year before. This is today's Yellow Line and is now operated using third rail power rather than overhead wire.

Officials from Skokie and the CTA cut the ribbon at Dempster Street on April 20, 1964, inaugurating Skokie Swift service on file miles of trackage formerly owned by the North Shore Line interurban, which had quit service just over a year before. This is today’s Yellow Line and is now operated using third rail power rather than overhead wire.

We ran a different picture from this event in a previous post:

On April 20, 1964, CTA and local officials cut the ribbon at Dempster, commencing service on the new five-mile-long Skokie Swift line. This represented but a small portion of the Chicago North Shore and Milwaukee interurban that abandoned service on January 21, 1963. The Chicago Transit Authority had to purchase about half of the Swift route anyway, as their connection to Skokie Shops went over NSL tracks. The CTA decided to offer an express service between Dempster and Howard stations, and put in a large parking lot. Service was put into place using existing equipment at the lowest possible cost. The late George Krambles was put in charge of this project, which received some federal funding as a "demonstration" service, at a time when that was still somewhat unusual. But CTA officials at the time indicated that they would still have started the Swift, even without federal funds. I was nine years old at the time, and rode these trains on the very first day. I can assure you they went 65 miles per hour, as I was watching the speedometer. Needless to say, the experiment was quite successful, and service continues on what is now the Yellow Line today, with the addition of one more stop at Oakton. (Richard Hofer Photo, David Stanley Collection)

On April 20, 1964, CTA and local officials cut the ribbon at Dempster, commencing service on the new five-mile-long Skokie Swift line. This represented but a small portion of the Chicago North Shore and Milwaukee interurban that abandoned service on January 21, 1963. The Chicago Transit Authority had to purchase about half of the Swift route anyway, as their connection to Skokie Shops went over NSL tracks. The CTA decided to offer an express service between Dempster and Howard stations, and put in a large parking lot. Service was put into place using existing equipment at the lowest possible cost. The late George Krambles was put in charge of this project, which received some federal funding as a “demonstration” service, at a time when that was still somewhat unusual. But CTA officials at the time indicated that they would still have started the Swift, even without federal funds. I was nine years old at the time, and rode these trains on the very first day. I can assure you they went 65 miles per hour, as I was watching the speedometer. Needless to say, the experiment was quite successful, and service continues on what is now the Yellow Line today, with the addition of one more stop at Oakton. (Richard Hofer Photo, David Stanley Collection)

A two-car South Shore Line train, made up of cars 103 and 24, has made it to downtown Chicago during a blizzard in January 1979.

A two-car South Shore Line train, made up of cars 103 and 24, has made it to downtown Chicago during a blizzard in January 1979.

This is the back end of a westbound two-car train of 2000s on the Douglas Park "L" in July 1966, approaching the Laramie Avenue station in Cicero. Laramie was closed in 1992, but was reopened in 2002-2003, while the nearby 54th Avenue station was being redone. The station house at Laramie has been declared historic and is the last remaining one of its type, and has been preserved, although no longer used.

This is the back end of a westbound two-car train of 2000s on the Douglas Park “L” in July 1966, approaching the Laramie Avenue station in Cicero. Laramie was closed in 1992, but was reopened in 2002-2003, while the nearby 54th Avenue station was being redone. The station house at Laramie has been declared historic and is the last remaining one of its type, and has been preserved, although no longer used.

A close-up of the previous picture, giving a better view of the Laramie Avenue station, with 54th Avenue off in the distance.

A close-up of the previous picture, giving a better view of the Laramie Avenue station, with 54th Avenue off in the distance.

A remnant of the Laramie station, as it looks today.

A remnant of the Laramie station, as it looks today.

Pittsburgh PCC 1646 on Arlington Avenue in Pittsburgh on April 25, 1974. This trackage serves as a bypass route for a nearby transit tunnel, and I actually have rode on it twice-- the first time was in 1985, when for a short time, it became an actual route, and then again in 2014, on a fantrip. (Joseph Saitta Photo)

Pittsburgh PCC 1646 on Arlington Avenue in Pittsburgh on April 25, 1974. This trackage serves as a bypass route for a nearby transit tunnel, and I actually have rode on it twice– the first time was in 1985, when for a short time, it became an actual route, and then again in 2014, on a fantrip. (Joseph Saitta Photo)

North Shore Line combine car 255 on June 1, 1962. Note the variations in paint color on this car, ranging from a dark green to a bluish green. That should be enough to drive would-be modelers crazy in their quest for authenticity. Don's Rail Photos: "255 was built by Jewett in 1917. It had all of the seats removed in the 1920s to provide a full length baggage car which ran in passenger trains. It was used for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra to move equipment to Ravinia. On July 2, 1942, the 40 seats were replaced. Then on December 1, 1946, the seats were again removed. In addition to the Symphony, the car was used for sailors' baggage from Great Lakes."

North Shore Line combine car 255 on June 1, 1962. Note the variations in paint color on this car, ranging from a dark green to a bluish green. That should be enough to drive would-be modelers crazy in their quest for authenticity. Don’s Rail Photos: “255 was built by Jewett in 1917. It had all of the seats removed in the 1920s to provide a full length baggage car which ran in passenger trains. It was used for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra to move equipment to Ravinia. On July 2, 1942, the 40 seats were replaced. Then on December 1, 1946, the seats were again removed. In addition to the Symphony, the car was used for sailors’ baggage from Great Lakes.”

A train of CTA 2000s on the then-new Dan Ryan line in November 1969 at 79th Street. (Rick Burn Photo)

A train of CTA 2000s on the then-new Dan Ryan line in November 1969 at 79th Street. (Rick Burn Photo)

A South Shore Line train at 130th and the under construction Calumet Superhighway in April 1952. (James P. Shuman Photo)

A South Shore Line train at 130th and the under construction Calumet Superhighway in April 1952. (James P. Shuman Photo)

Since this shows a Logan Square "L" train on the Met main line, just west of the Loop, it must have been taken between August 1950 (when the 6000s were introduced) and February 1951 (when the Dearborn-Milwaukee Subway opened).

Since this shows a Logan Square “L” train on the Met main line, just west of the Loop, it must have been taken between August 1950 (when the 6000s were introduced) and February 1951 (when the Dearborn-Milwaukee Subway opened).

This June 1975 photo of a pair of derelict CTA 4000s was, and remains, somewhat of a mystery. The location is marked as "Forest Glen Yard," which is actually the name of a bus yard on Chicago's northwest side. I posted this to our Facebook group, in hopes someone might help identify the location. Three possibilities were suggested: CTA Skokie Shops, Michigan City on the South Shore Line, and Joliet. The nearby freight yard and the orange caboose are clues. According to Andre Kristopans, that's Chuck Tauscher at right. In his prime, he was an excellent photographer. (S. Downey Photo)

This June 1975 photo of a pair of derelict CTA 4000s was, and remains, somewhat of a mystery. The location is marked as “Forest Glen Yard,” which is actually the name of a bus yard on Chicago’s northwest side. I posted this to our Facebook group, in hopes someone might help identify the location. Three possibilities were suggested: CTA Skokie Shops, Michigan City on the South Shore Line, and Joliet. The nearby freight yard and the orange caboose are clues. According to Andre Kristopans, that’s Chuck Tauscher at right. In his prime, he was an excellent photographer. (S. Downey Photo)

A close-up of the late Charles Tauscher, from the previous photo.

A close-up of the late Charles Tauscher, from the previous photo.

I really have no information about this photo, other than that it might be Mexico City. If I had to guess a date, I would say the early 1960s. What attracted me to it is that you don't see a lot of photos showing a streetcar and a trolley bus together.

I really have no information about this photo, other than that it might be Mexico City. If I had to guess a date, I would say the early 1960s. What attracted me to it is that you don’t see a lot of photos showing a streetcar and a trolley bus together.

In a previous post, we ran a photo of the Logan Square interlocking tower, taken by the late Roger Puta on April 9, 1966, shortly before this tower was replaced by a new one that continued in use until the line was extended in 1970. Another, similar photo turned up recently, and I bought it. Imagine my surprise when it turns out to have been taken mere minutes after the first one! Although I cannot say for certain, this one may also have been taken by Roger Puta. I believe the man at left is his friend Rick Burn, whose name is written on the back of the slide. However, if that is him, he could hardly have taken the picture, and due to the great similarity with the other shot, it's entirely possible that Roger Puta took this one as well.

In a previous post, we ran a photo of the Logan Square interlocking tower, taken by the late Roger Puta on April 9, 1966, shortly before this tower was replaced by a new one that continued in use until the line was extended in 1970. Another, similar photo turned up recently, and I bought it. Imagine my surprise when it turns out to have been taken mere minutes after the first one! Although I cannot say for certain, this one may also have been taken by Roger Puta. I believe the man at left is his friend Rick Burn, whose name is written on the back of the slide. However, if that is him, he could hardly have taken the picture, and due to the great similarity with the other shot, it’s entirely possible that Roger Puta took this one as well.

Here is the other photo by Roger Puta:

CTA interlocking tower at Logan Square Terminal, Chicago, IL on April 9, 1966 Roger Puta photograph Roger wrote, "The last mechanical interlocking on the CTA and will be replaced with a new tower."

CTA interlocking tower at Logan Square Terminal, Chicago, IL on April 9, 1966
Roger Puta photograph
Roger wrote, “The last mechanical interlocking on the CTA and will be replaced with a new tower.”

South Shore Line trains at the Randolph Street Terminal in August 1965. This terminal has since been completely redone and is now underground, beneath Millennium Park.

South Shore Line trains at the Randolph Street Terminal in August 1965. This terminal has since been completely redone and is now underground, beneath Millennium Park.

On May 25, 1958 there was a fantrip on Chicago’s last remaining streetcar line (Wentworth), less than a month before the final run. This included a tour of South Shops at 77th and Vincennes, and the CTA Historical Collection was trotted out one last time for photos, of which there are many circulating. This batch was taken by J. W. Vigrass. The collection was eventually moved to the Lawndale car barn, where it languished until the 1980s, when it was parsed out to various museums.

CTA PCC 7207 is on Ravenswood near Devon Station (car barn) in the 1950s.

CTA PCC 7207 is on Ravenswood near Devon Station (car barn) in the 1950s.

This is the third "L" photo I have, taken at this location, which at first was a mystery, but eventually turned out to be an annex (since demolished) just north of the Merchandise Mart.  All three photos may have been taken at the same time, and by the same photographer, in the 1930s.  This one shows North Shore Line cars 768 and 769.

This is the third “L” photo I have, taken at this location, which at first was a mystery, but eventually turned out to be an annex (since demolished) just north of the Merchandise Mart. All three photos may have been taken at the same time, and by the same photographer, in the 1930s. This one shows North Shore Line cars 768 and 769.

This is a Brooklyn PCC car, one of a hundred in use from 1936 to 1956. It is signed for Route 68 and could be heading to the Brooklyn Bridge. Other than that, I have no information.

This is a Brooklyn PCC car, one of a hundred in use from 1936 to 1956. It is signed for Route 68 and could be heading to the Brooklyn Bridge. Other than that, I have no information.

Stereo images were popular around 1900, and when placed in the proper viewer (sometimes called a "stereopticon") provided a 3-D effect. This is the left picture from a stereo pair, showing cable cars on Madison Street in downtown Chicago. Some say that the Loop got its name from the paths taken by downtown cable cars, but research has shown the term came into popular use because of the "L' and the Union Loop, completed in 1897. There are no overhead wires in view here, and none were permitted downtown until 1906. The tracks at left may have been used by horse car lines, since there is no trough for a cable.

Stereo images were popular around 1900, and when placed in the proper viewer (sometimes called a “stereopticon”) provided a 3-D effect. This is the left picture from a stereo pair, showing cable cars on Madison Street in downtown Chicago. Some say that the Loop got its name from the paths taken by downtown cable cars, but research has shown the term came into popular use because of the “L’ and the Union Loop, completed in 1897. There are no overhead wires in view here, and none were permitted downtown until 1906. The tracks at left may have been used by horse car lines, since there is no trough for a cable.

The right image of the stereo pair.

The right image of the stereo pair.

This picture shows a Chicago PCC at the Pullman plant in Massachusetts. Chances are excellent that this is car 4062, the first of 310 that Pullman would build for Chicago, starting in 1946.

This picture shows a Chicago PCC at the Pullman plant in Massachusetts. Chances are excellent that this is car 4062, the first of 310 that Pullman would build for Chicago, starting in 1946.

This is a rare agent's stub for what is known as an "Interline ticket," used for one trip involving two different railroads. In this case, it seems the trip involved the Monon Railroad and the Chicago North Shore and Milwaukee, aka the North Shore Line. The passenger may have been a new recruit during World War II, as this ticket was apparently requested by the US government.

This is a rare agent’s stub for what is known as an “Interline ticket,” used for one trip involving two different railroads. In this case, it seems the trip involved the Monon Railroad and the Chicago North Shore and Milwaukee, aka the North Shore Line. The passenger may have been a new recruit during World War II, as this ticket was apparently requested by the US government.

CRT 4096 is part of a Normal Park Express. This picture may have been taken on the south side. This car was part of the original order of 4000s, which came with a center door that was never actually used in service. It was closed off to provide more seating. These cars were known as "Baldies," as opposed to the second 4000s order, the "Plushies." Our resident south side expert M.E. writes: "This picture must have been taken underneath the pedestrian bridge at the Indiana Ave. station when the shoppers' specials were running express from 43rd St. into the Loop. The shoppers' specials ran only northbound. Returning southbound, they were local trains using the local southbound track, which is the track next to the platform at Indiana Ave.. This is the only circumstance I can think of in which a sign would say "Express Normal Pk". Notice that the Normal Park car is the last car in the train. West of the Harvard station on the Englewood line, Normal Park cars were always attached as the last car of northbound mainline Englewood trains and detached from being the last car on southbound mainline Englewood trains. That arrangement lasted until 1949."

CRT 4096 is part of a Normal Park Express. This picture may have been taken on the south side. This car was part of the original order of 4000s, which came with a center door that was never actually used in service. It was closed off to provide more seating. These cars were known as “Baldies,” as opposed to the second 4000s order, the “Plushies.”
Our resident south side expert M.E. writes: “This picture must have been taken underneath the pedestrian bridge at the Indiana Ave. station when the shoppers’ specials were running express from 43rd St. into the Loop. The shoppers’ specials ran only northbound. Returning southbound, they were local trains using the local southbound track, which is the track next to the platform at Indiana Ave.. This is the only circumstance I can think of in which a sign would say “Express Normal Pk”. Notice that the Normal Park car is the last car in the train. West of the Harvard station on the Englewood line, Normal Park cars were always attached as the last car of northbound mainline Englewood trains and detached from being the last car on southbound mainline Englewood trains. That arrangement lasted until 1949.”

CRT wood car 1136 is part of a Howard Street Express. The location might be the same as the previous picture.

CRT wood car 1136 is part of a Howard Street Express. The location might be the same as the previous picture.

CRT 4415, a "Plushie," is part of a Howard Street Express. The nickname came from the plush seats used on these cars. "L" cars wore flags on certain holidays such as the 4th of July.

CRT 4415, a “Plushie,” is part of a Howard Street Express. The nickname came from the plush seats used on these cars. “L” cars wore flags on certain holidays such as the 4th of July.

North Shore Line Electroliner set 801-802 is heading northbound at Loyola on Chicago's north side "L". If the train had been southbound, there would be overhead wire, then in use by freight locomotives. This Electroliner set is currently undergoing restoration at the Illinois Railway Museum.

North Shore Line Electroliner set 801-802 is heading northbound at Loyola on Chicago’s north side “L”. If the train had been southbound, there would be overhead wire, then in use by freight locomotives. This Electroliner set is currently undergoing restoration at the Illinois Railway Museum.

North Shore Line 743 in a pocket track at Edison Court.

North Shore Line 743 in a pocket track at Edison Court.

Photos showing North Shore Line trains being scrapped after the 1963 abandonment are rare-- and this is not one of them. This is car 416, built in 1916 by Cincinnati Car Company, and rebuilt in 1942. It was scrapped shortly after this picture was taken at North Chicago on January 21, 1956, after the car had been damaged in a fire.

Photos showing North Shore Line trains being scrapped after the 1963 abandonment are rare– and this is not one of them. This is car 416, built in 1916 by Cincinnati Car Company, and rebuilt in 1942. It was scrapped shortly after this picture was taken at North Chicago on January 21, 1956, after the car had been damaged in a fire.

Atlantic City once had an interurban known as the Shore Fast Line. Interestingly, it inspired one of the four railroad names in the game Monopoly, the "Short Line." In the early 1930s, Charles Todd, an early Monopoly player, got tired of trying to fit Shore Fast Line on his handmade Monopoly board, and "shortened" it as a joke. Charles Darrow copied it verbatim, and began to market this version of Atlantic City Monopoly commercially, and the rest is history.

Atlantic City once had an interurban known as the Shore Fast Line. Interestingly, it inspired one of the four railroad names in the game Monopoly, the “Short Line.” In the early 1930s, Charles Todd, an early Monopoly player, got tired of trying to fit Shore Fast Line on his handmade Monopoly board, and “shortened” it as a joke. Charles Darrow copied it verbatim, and began to market this version of Atlantic City Monopoly commercially, and the rest is history.

South Shore Line car 100 wore patriotic colors during World War II, and helped promote the sale of War Bonds. A different picture of this car appeared in my 2017 book Chicago Trolleys.

South Shore Line car 100 wore patriotic colors during World War II, and helped promote the sale of War Bonds. A different picture of this car appeared in my 2017 book Chicago Trolleys.

CRT Shopper’s Specials Timetables, 1923-24

Chicago’s “L” system started out as four separate companies, that gradually came together as a single system. This evolution reached its fruition in 1924, when all four entities were combined into the Chicago Rapid Transit Company as part of the Samuel Insull empire.

From about 1913 on, the “L” had been operated more or less as a single unit, but the four underlying companies were still there. As part of this unification process, new all-steel state of the art rapid transit cars were ordered, the 4000-series, in two distinct batches. These were the first “L” cars intended for use on all lines– previously, all cars had been at least partially made from wood, and were ordered for use on one of the four independent “L” lines.

The first 4000s were built circa 1913-15, and the second group from 1923-24. When the later 4000s were put into service, the Insull interests instituted a mid-day “Shopper’s Special” express service on five lines in time for the 1923 Christmas season.

We were fortunate recently to be able to purchase three rare 1923-24 timetables for this service. This type of service was most successful on the Evanston line over the years. The Chicago Transit Authority re-introduced a “Shopper’s Special” as a mid-day Evanston Express in the late 1950s, and this lasted into the early 1990s.

Photos by William C. Hoffman

Bill Hoffman used a Leica iiig camera similar to this for many years.

Bill Hoffman used a Leica iiig camera similar to this for many years.

On October 22, 1953, work was far along on dismantling the former CTA Garfield Park "L" station at Western and Congress. Remarkably, trains ran on this line less than a month before this picture was taken. The tracks at ground level were a bypass route for Western Avenue streetcars, to facilitate construction of a new bridge over the eventual Congress (now Eisenhower) expressway. The view looks to the north. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

On October 22, 1953, work was far along on dismantling the former CTA Garfield Park “L” station at Western and Congress. Remarkably, trains ran on this line less than a month before this picture was taken. The tracks at ground level were a bypass route for Western Avenue streetcars, to facilitate construction of a new bridge over the eventual Congress (now Eisenhower) expressway. The view looks to the north. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

An interior view of CTA wood car 1813, built by ACF in 1907. This picture was taken on a May 1, 1955 fantrip, while the train was on the Van Buren Street temporary ground level trackage, where the Garfield Park "L" ran from 1953 to 1958 during construction of the nearby Congress rapid transit line. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

An interior view of CTA wood car 1813, built by ACF in 1907. This picture was taken on a May 1, 1955 fantrip, while the train was on the Van Buren Street temporary ground level trackage, where the Garfield Park “L” ran from 1953 to 1958 during construction of the nearby Congress rapid transit line. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

In a previous post, we ran a picture of car 1813 (not by Bill Hoffman), probably taken on the same May 1, 1955 fantrip:

CRT 1813 is part of a two-car train at Sedgwick. The flags may indicate this was a fantrip. (George Trapp Collection)

CRT 1813 is part of a two-car train at Sedgwick. The flags may indicate this was a fantrip. (George Trapp Collection)

Bill Hoffman took this picture on July 8, 1954, to compare "old" (left) and "new" types of third rail collection shoes on CTA 6000-series "L" cars. This photo was taken at 43rd Street.

Bill Hoffman took this picture on July 8, 1954, to compare “old” (left) and “new” types of third rail collection shoes on CTA 6000-series “L” cars. This photo was taken at 43rd Street.

Steel wheels, trolley poles, and coupling detail of CTA high performance cars 6129-6130 at Sedgwick on December 11, 1955. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

Steel wheels, trolley poles, and coupling detail of CTA high performance cars 6129-6130 at Sedgwick on December 11, 1955. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

On July 21, 1950, a CTA Grafield Park "L" train approaches Marshfield from the west, while a westbound Chicago Aurora & Elgin train is at the station. The tracks curving off to the left are for the Douglas Park branch (today's Pink Line), (William C. Hoffman Photo)

On July 21, 1950, a CTA Grafield Park “L” train approaches Marshfield from the west, while a westbound Chicago Aurora & Elgin train is at the station. The tracks curving off to the left are for the Douglas Park branch (today’s Pink Line), (William C. Hoffman Photo)