Twilight Time

This slide, taken in March 1959, is marked as showing the first train (a diesel) that went east of the DesPlaines River via the bridge that had been relocated during expressway construction. As we now know, CA&E passenger service did not resume, and eventually this new track connection was cut back to east of the river, and became the tail track for the CTA yard. The bridge remained in place for many years, but was eventually removed. This picture appears to have been taken west of the river, by the Commonwealth Edison facilities. The ballast appears fresh. (Zaiman Gaibel Photo)

This slide, taken in March 1959, is marked as showing the first train (a diesel) that went east of the DesPlaines River via the bridge that had been relocated during expressway construction. As we now know, CA&E passenger service did not resume, and eventually this new track connection was cut back to east of the river, and became the tail track for the CTA yard. The bridge remained in place for many years, but was eventually removed. This picture appears to have been taken west of the river, by the Commonwealth Edison facilities. The ballast appears fresh. (Zalman Gaibel Photo)

Most of the pictures in today’s post come from the collection I inherited from my late friend Jeffrey L. Wien and feature the Chicago, Aurora & Elgin interurban in its twilight days.

Some 30 of these images show some late electric freight moves in March 1959, nearly two years after the abandonment of passenger service, and just a few months before the CA&E gave up the ghost. I don’t recall ever seeing any photos of such late operations on the CA&E, much less this many of them.

Once passenger service ended, the bulk of CA&E employees were let go, but some were retained on the basis of seniority. This means only the oldest of the “old timers” remained, and some of them were well past what is now considered retirement age.

There are also views of the former passenger stations at 17th Avenue in Maywood, Bellwood, and Wheaton.

There is one other remarkable photo, showing what is said to be the first train on the newly rebuilt CA&E tracks leading to the DesPlaines Avenue CTA Terminal in March 1959. While this is a diesel train, it does show that at least one train ran on the new tracks, which were relocated during expressway construction.

Apparently, part of the deal that CA&E made when they sold their right of way crossing the DesPlaines River, was that their tracks would be “made whole” so that it could be possible to restore running passenger service. Although the tracks were restored, service never resumed. The assumption has been that “no trains ever ran on them,” but the photo shown above indicates otherwise.

These historic photos, plus some others taken in August and September 1959 (after the final abandonment) at Wheaton were taken by the late Zalman Gaibel (1943-1995). I wasn’t able to find much information about him online, other than that he graduated from MIT in 1963. There is a slide show tribute that you can see here.

We have rounded these CA&E photos with a few others, taken in the latter days of interurban service over the “L”, most by William C. Hoffman, and one by Truman Hefner.

We are also featuring many wonderful photos, both black and white and color, taken by John V. Engleman in the late 1950s and early 1960s, mostly in Boston, but some in Chicago.

We hope that you will enjoy them, and we than Mr. Engleman for his generosity in sharing them with our readers.

Keep those cards and letters coming in, folks.

-David Sadowski

PS- You might also like our Trolley Dodger Facebook auxiliary, a private group that now has 800 members.

Our friend Kenneth Gear now has a Facebook group for the Railroad Record Club. If you enjoy listening to audio recordings of classic railroad trains, whether steam, electric, or diesel, you might consider joining.

Work on our North Shore Line book is ongoing. Donations are needed in order to bring this to a successful conclusion. You will find donation links at the top and bottom of each post. We thank you in advance for your time and consideration.

CA&E Freight Moves in March 1959

All the photos in this section were taken by Zalman Gaibel.

17th Avenue.

17th Avenue.

Eastbound at Mannheim.

Eastbound at Mannheim.

Bellwood Station.

Bellwood Station.

Bellwood.

Bellwood.

Bellwood/Mannheim, looking west.

Bellwood/Mannheim, looking west.

Bellwood Interchange.

Bellwood Interchange.

Bellwood/Mannheim.

Bellwood/Mannheim.

Bellwood/Mannheim.

Bellwood/Mannheim.

Bellwood/Mannheim.

Bellwood/Mannheim.

Westbound at Bellwood/Mannheim.

Westbound at Bellwood/Mannheim.

Southbound into Cook County.

Southbound into Cook County.

Southbound into Cook County.

Southbound into Cook County.

Mannheim Interchange.

Mannheim Interchange.

Mannheim Interchange.

Mannheim Interchange.

Bellwood/Mannheim.

Bellwood/Mannheim.

Bellwood Station.

Bellwood Station.

Mannheim-Cook County.

Mannheim-Cook County.

Bellwood/Mannheim.

Bellwood/Mannheim.

The CA&E Wheaton Yards in August and September 1959

All the photos in this section were taken by Zalman Gaibel.

The lineup at Wheaton.

The lineup at Wheaton.

Cars 407, 411, and 417. Don's Rail Photos: "Pullman Cars 400-419. These 20 cars were the first steel cars on the Roaring Elgin and were built by Pullman in 1923."

Cars 407, 411, and 417. Don’s Rail Photos: “Pullman Cars 400-419. These 20 cars were the first steel cars on the Roaring Elgin and were built by Pullman in 1923.”

Car 301. Don's Rail Photos: "301 was built by Niles Car & Mfg Co in 1906. It was modernized in December 1940."

Car 301. Don’s Rail Photos: “301 was built by Niles Car & Mfg Co in 1906. It was modernized in December 1940.”

Car 307. Don's Rail Photos: "307 was built by Niles Car & Mfg Co in 1906, It was modernized in July 1939."

Car 307. Don’s Rail Photos: “307 was built by Niles Car & Mfg Co in 1906, It was modernized in July 1939.”

Car 20. Don's Rail Photos: "20 was built by Niles Car in 1902. It was preserved by Railway Electric Leasing & Investing Corp in 1962. It was then transferred to Fox River Trolley Museum in 1984. It is the oldest operating interurban in the United States."

Car 20. Don’s Rail Photos: “20 was built by Niles Car in 1902. It was preserved by Railway Electric Leasing & Investing Corp in 1962. It was then transferred to Fox River Trolley Museum in 1984. It is the oldest operating interurban in the United States.”

Cars 456, 455, 452, and 460. Don's Rail Photos: "St. Louis Cars 451-460. These 10 cars were the last cars and were built by St. Louis Car in October 1945. They had been ordered in 1941 but were held up by World War II. They had to be able to operate with older equipment, and this precluded any radical design. They were highly improved over earlier cars." Of the ten cars, only four were saved, all originally purchased by Trolleyville USA (cars 451, 453, 458, and 460). Of these, 458 is at the Fox River Trolley Museum, and the rest are at the Illinois Railway Museum.

Cars 456, 455, 452, and 460. Don’s Rail Photos: “St. Louis Cars 451-460. These 10 cars were the last cars and were built by St. Louis Car in October 1945. They had been ordered in 1941 but were held up by World War II. They had to be able to operate with older equipment, and this precluded any radical design. They were highly improved over earlier cars.” Of the ten cars, only four were saved, all originally purchased by Trolleyville USA (cars 451, 453, 458, and 460). Of these, 458 is at the Fox River Trolley Museum, and the rest are at the Illinois Railway Museum.

Car 603. Don's Rail Photos: "In 1937, the CA&E needed additional equipment. Much was available, but most of the cars suffered from extended lack of maintenance. Finally, 5 coaches were found on the Washington Baltimore & Annapolis which were just the ticket. 35 thru 39, built by Cincinnati Car in 1913, were purchased and remodeled for service as 600 thru 604. The ends were narrowed for service on the El. They had been motors, but came out as control trailers. Other modifications included drawbars, control, etc. A new paint scheme was devised. Blue and grey with red trim and tan roof was adopted from several selections. They entered service between July and October in 1937. 603 was built by Cincinnati Car Co in 1913 as WB&A 38. It was sold as CA&E 603 in September 1937."

Car 603. Don’s Rail Photos: “In 1937, the CA&E needed additional equipment. Much was available, but most of the cars suffered from extended lack of maintenance. Finally, 5 coaches were found on the Washington Baltimore & Annapolis which were just the ticket. 35 thru 39, built by Cincinnati Car in 1913, were purchased and remodeled for service as 600 thru 604. The ends were narrowed for service on the El. They had been motors, but came out as control trailers. Other modifications included drawbars, control, etc. A new paint scheme was devised. Blue and grey with red trim and tan roof was adopted from several selections. They entered service between July and October in 1937. 603 was built by Cincinnati Car Co in 1913 as WB&A 38. It was sold as CA&E 603 in September 1937.”

Car 20.

Cars 603, 604, 410, and 424. Don's Rail Photos: "424 was built by Cincinnati Car Co in 1927, #2055."

Cars 603, 604, 410, and 424. Don’s Rail Photos: “424 was built by Cincinnati Car Co in 1927, #2055.”

Wheaton station. It was demolished in May 1966, and we ran some pictures showing that in a previous post.

Wheaton station. It was demolished in May 1966, and we ran some pictures showing that in a previous post.

Car 600.

Line car 11. Don's Rail Photos: "11 was built by Brill in 1910, #16483. It was rebuilt to a line car in 1947 and replaced 45. It was acquired by Railway Equipment Leasing & Investment Co in 1962 and became Fox River Trolley Museum in 1984. It was lettered as Fox River & Eastern."

Line car 11. Don’s Rail Photos: “11 was built by Brill in 1910, #16483. It was rebuilt to a line car in 1947 and replaced 45. It was acquired by Railway Equipment Leasing & Investment Co in 1962 and became Fox River Trolley Museum in 1984. It was lettered as Fox River & Eastern.”

Caboose 1004, the same one seen in action in a different photo.

Caboose 1004, the same one seen in action in a different photo.

Cars 402 and 600.

Tool car 7, plus cars 458, 459, 306, 318, and 317, among others. Don's Rail Photos: "7 was built by Jewett Car in 1906. In 1941 it was rebuilt as a tool car."

Tool car 7, plus cars 458, 459, 306, 318, and 317, among others. Don’s Rail Photos: “7 was built by Jewett Car in 1906. In 1941 it was rebuilt as a tool car.”

Cars 451, 458, 459, 306, 318, and 317. Don's Rail Photos: "306 was built by Niles Car & Mfg Co in 1906. It was modernized in July 1941. 317 was built by Jewett Car Co in 1913. It was sold to RELIC in 1962 and transferred as FRT in 1984. 318 was built by Jewett Car Co in 1914. It had steel sheathing and was modernized in 1944. It was sold to Wisconsin Electric Raiway Historical Society in 1962. It was wrecked in transit and the parts were sold to IRM to restore 321."

Cars 451, 458, 459, 306, 318, and 317. Don’s Rail Photos: “306 was built by Niles Car & Mfg Co in 1906. It was modernized in July 1941. 317 was built by Jewett Car Co in 1913. It was sold to RELIC in 1962 and transferred as FRT in 1984. 318 was built by Jewett Car Co in 1914. It had steel sheathing and was modernized in 1944. It was sold to Wisconsin Electric Raiway Historical Society in 1962. It was wrecked in transit and the parts were sold to IRM to restore 321.”

Car 307.

Car 417.

Car 417.

Car 318.

Car 318.

Cars 603 and 604.

Cars 603 and 604.

The Wheaton Yards.

The Wheaton Yards.

Car 307.

Car 307.

Miscellaneous CA&E Photos

The view looking west from the Western Avenue "L" platform on the Garfield Park line on June 9, 1953. An eastbound "L" train approaches, while passing a westbound CA&E train. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

The view looking west from the Western Avenue “L” platform on the Garfield Park line on June 9, 1953. An eastbound “L” train approaches, while passing a westbound CA&E train. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

The view looking west from Marshfield Avenue on August 23, 1953 shows a westbound three-car CA&E train. It appears that the ground at left is being prepared for the construction of a new "L" span, running north and south at this point. Once the Garfield Park structure was removed, after September 27, 1953, this new span allowed Douglas Park trains to go to the Loop via the Lake Street "L" about one mile north of here. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

The view looking west from Marshfield Avenue on August 23, 1953 shows a westbound three-car CA&E train. It appears that the ground at left is being prepared for the construction of a new “L” span, running north and south at this point. Once the Garfield Park structure was removed, after September 27, 1953, this new span allowed Douglas Park trains to go to the Loop via the Lake Street “L” about one mile north of here. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

CA&E 319 is at the back end of a westbound five-car train at Marshfield Avenue on November 30, 1950. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

CA&E 319 is at the back end of a westbound five-car train at Marshfield Avenue on November 30, 1950. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

CA&E 426 is at the back end of a westbound four-car train just west of Western Avenue on August 9, 1950. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

CA&E 426 is at the back end of a westbound four-car train just west of Western Avenue on August 9, 1950. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

CA&E 48 heads up an eastbound five-car train near Western Avenue on August 9, 1950. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

CA&E 48 heads up an eastbound five-car train near Western Avenue on August 9, 1950. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

We have run a different version of this same image a couple times before, but this was scanned from a duplicate slide made in the 1950s, and has less cropping than the later versions. CA&E 460 heads up a westbound train at Sacramento Avenue in January 1952. The other cars are 422 and 428. (Truman Hefner Photo)

We have run a different version of this same image a couple times before, but this was scanned from a duplicate slide made in the 1950s, and has less cropping than the later versions. CA&E 460 heads up a westbound train at Sacramento Avenue in January 1952. The other cars are 422 and 428. (Truman Hefner Photo)

It's hard to make out the number. Is this car 26, or 28? Don's Rail Photos: "28 was built by Niles Car in 1902. It was modernized at an unknown date and retired in 1959." Not sure who took this photo, but it was not part of the Zalman Gaibel batch.

It’s hard to make out the number. Is this car 26, or 28? Don’s Rail Photos: “28 was built by Niles Car in 1902. It was modernized at an unknown date and retired in 1959.” Not sure who took this photo, but it was not part of the Zalman Gaibel batch.

Wells Street Terminal Photo

While we are on the subject of the CA&E, I finally got a better quality version of this excellent photo thanks to Rex Butler. It which appeared in the August 1927 issue of the North Shore Bulletin. It shows the newly renovated Wells Street Terminal. While North Shore trains were only occasional visitors there, Insull owned the CA&E, North Shore Line, and the Chicago Rapid Transit Company, so one hand washes the other. The terminal remained in use until the CA&E stopped using it in September 1953.

Photos by John V. Engleman

Car 3283 and PCC 3187. Don's Rail Photos: "3179 thru 3196 were built by Pullman-Standard in 1945, #W6710B."

Car 3283 and PCC 3187. Don’s Rail Photos: “3179 thru 3196 were built by Pullman-Standard in 1945, #W6710B.”

This is on the Blue Line.

This is on the Blue Line.

PCC 3056. Don's Rail Photos: "3055 thru 3062 were built by Pullman-Standard in 1944, #W6697."

PCC 3056. Don’s Rail Photos: “3055 thru 3062 were built by Pullman-Standard in 1944, #W6697.”

The end of the Ashmont-Mattapan line.

The end of the Ashmont-Mattapan line.

PCC 3304. This is a "picture window" PCC, built in 1951 by Pullman-Standard. Starting in 1959, these cars were assigned to the new Riverside branch.

PCC 3304. This is a “picture window” PCC, built in 1951 by Pullman-Standard. Starting in 1959, these cars were assigned to the new Riverside branch.

PCC 3208, among others, at the end of the Ashmont-Mattapan line.

PCC 3208, among others, at the end of the Ashmont-Mattapan line.

PCC 3210.

PCC 3210.

PCC 3018. This was part of the first batch of PCCs ordered for Boston in 1940. Don's Rail Photos: "3018 was built by Pullman-Standard in 1940, #W6629. It was scrapped in 1974."

PCC 3018. This was part of the first batch of PCCs ordered for Boston in 1940. Don’s Rail Photos: “3018 was built by Pullman-Standard in 1940, #W6629. It was scrapped in 1974.”

Service car 6321.

Service car 6321.

Snow plow 5164.

Snow plow 5164.

PCC 3197.

PCC 3197.

PCC 3004. Don's Rail Photos: "3004 was built by Pullman-Standard in 1940, #W6629. It was scrapped in 1991."

PCC 3004. Don’s Rail Photos: “3004 was built by Pullman-Standard in 1940, #W6629. It was scrapped in 1991.”

Test car 396.

Test car 396.

The interior of a PCC.

The interior of a PCC.

CTA trolley bus 9510,

CTA trolley bus 9510,

Unfortunately, this medium format negative was partially light struck. I made another version in black-and-white so this wouldn't be so noticeable.

Unfortunately, this medium format negative was partially light struck. I made another version in black-and-white so this wouldn’t be so noticeable.

PCC 3338, an ex-Dallas double-ended "Texas Ranger." Don's Rail Photos: 3338 was built by Pullman-Standard in 1945, #W6699, as DR&T 603. It was sold as MTA 3338 in 1959 and acquired by Trolley Inc in 1983. It was purchased by Seashore Trolley Museum in 1994." This is at the old surface station at North Station. This line has since been relocated into a subway. There was also an elevated platform at this station.

PCC 3338, an ex-Dallas double-ended “Texas Ranger.” Don’s Rail Photos: 3338 was built by Pullman-Standard in 1945, #W6699, as DR&T 603. It was sold as MTA 3338 in 1959 and acquired by Trolley Inc in 1983. It was purchased by Seashore Trolley Museum in 1994.” This is at the old surface station at North Station. This line has since been relocated into a subway. There was also an elevated platform at this station.

PCC 3014.

PCC 3014.

PCC 3198.

PCC 3198.

PCC 285 is running heads a two-car train, headed for Cleveland Circle on what is now the MBTA Green Line "C" branch.

PCC 285 is running heads a two-car train, headed for Cleveland Circle on what is now the MBTA Green Line “C” branch.

Chicago in the early-to-mid 1960s. Note the Marina Towers are under construction.

Chicago in the early-to-mid 1960s. Note the Marina Towers are under construction.

Chicago in the early-to-mid 1960s. The Prudential Building was never Chicago's tallest, being slightly shorter than the Board of Trade building, but it did have a popular observation deck in the 1960s, before being eclipsed by the Hancock building and Sear Tower.

Chicago in the early-to-mid 1960s. The Prudential Building was never Chicago’s tallest, being slightly shorter than the Board of Trade building, but it did have a popular observation deck in the 1960s, before being eclipsed by the Hancock building and Sear Tower.

CTA trolley bus 9521.

CTA trolley bus 9521.

CTA trolley bus 9221. This is on North Avenue at Humboldt Park.

CTA trolley bus 9221. This is on North Avenue at Humboldt Park.

CTA 6205-6206, among the first "curved door" PCCs.

CTA 6205-6206, among the first “curved door” PCCs.

CTA trolley bus 9448 is running on Route 52 - Kedzie.

CTA trolley bus 9448 is running on Route 52 – Kedzie.

A Guide to the Railroad Record Club E-Book

William A. Steventon recording the sounds of the North Shore Line in April 1956. (Kenneth Gear Collection)

William A. Steventon recording the sounds of the North Shore Line in April 1956. (Kenneth Gear Collection)

Our good friend Ken Gear has been hard at work on collecting all things related to the late William Steventon’s railroad audio recordings and releases. The result is a new book on disc, A Guide To the Railroad Record Club. This was quite a project and labor of love on Ken’s part!

Kenneth Gear has written and compiled a complete history of William Steventon‘s Railroad Record Club, which issued 42 different LPs of steam, electric, and diesel railroad audio, beginning with its origins in 1953.

This “book on disc” format allows us to present not only a detailed history of the club and an updated account of Kenneth Gear’s purchase of the William Steventon estate, but it also includes audio files, photo scans and movie files. Virtually all the Railroad Record Club archive is gathered in one place!

Price: $19.99

$10 from the sale of each RRC E-Book will go to Kenneth Gear to repay him for some of his costs in saving this important history.

Now Available on Compact Disc:

RRC08D
Railroad Record Club #08 Deluxe Edition: Canadian National: Canadian Railroading in the Days of Steam, Recorded by Elwin Purington
The Complete Recording From the Original Master Tapes
Price: $15.99

Kenneth Gear‘s doggedness and determination resulted in his tracking down and purchasing the surviving RRC master tapes a few years back, and he has been hard at work having them digitized, at considerable personal expense, so that you and many others can enjoy them with today’s technology. We have already released a few RRC Rarities CDs from Ken’s collection.

When Ken heard the digitized version of RRC LP #08, Canadian National: Canadian Railroading in the Days of Steam, recorded by the late Elwin Purington, he was surprised to find the original tapes were more than twice the length of the 10″ LP. The resulting LP had been considerably edited down to the limited space available, 15 minutes per side.

The scenes were the same, but each was greatly shortened. Now, on compact disc, it is possible to present the full length recordings of this classic LP, which was one of Steventon’s best sellers and an all-around favorite, for the very first time.

Canadian National. Steaming giants pound high iron on mountain trails, rumble over trestles, hit torpedos and whistle for many road crossings. Mountain railroading with heavy power and lingering whistles! Includes locomotives 3566, 4301, 6013, 3560.

Total time – 72:57

$5 from the sale of RRC08D CD will go to Kenneth Gear to repay him for some of his costs in saving this important history.

Chicago’s Lost “L”s Online Presentation

We recently gave an online presentation about our book Chicago’s Lost “L”s for the Chicago Public Library, as part of their One Book, One Chicago series. You can watch it online by following this link.

The Trolley Dodger On the Air

We appeared on the Dave Plier Show on WGN radio on July 16, 2021, to discuss Chicago’s Lost “L”s. You can hear that discussion here.

Our Latest Book, Now Available:

Chicago’s Lost “L”s

From the back cover:

Chicago’s system of elevated railways, known locally as the “L,” has run continuously since 1892 and, like the city, has never stood still. It helped neighborhoods grow, brought their increasingly diverse populations together, and gave the famous Loop its name. But today’s system has changed radically over the years. Chicago’s Lost “L”s tells the story of former lines such as Garfield Park, Humboldt Park, Kenwood, Stockyards, Normal Park, Westchester, and Niles Center. It was once possible to take high-speed trains on the L directly to Aurora, Elgin, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The L started out as four different companies, two starting out using steam engines instead of electricity. Eventually, all four came together via the Union Loop. The L is more than a way of getting around. Its trains are a place where people meet and interact. Some say the best way to experience the city is via the L, with its second-story view. Chicago’s Lost “L”s is virtually a “secret history” of Chicago, and this is your ticket. David Sadowski grew up riding the L all over the city. He is the author of Chicago Trolleys and Building Chicago’s Subways and runs the online Trolley Dodger blog.

The Images of America series celebrates the history of neighborhoods, towns, and cities across the country. Using archival photographs, each title presents the distinctive stories from the past that shape the character of the community today. Arcadia is proud to play a part in the preservation of local heritage, making history available to all.

Title Chicago’s Lost “L”s
Images of America
Author David Sadowski
Edition illustrated
Publisher Arcadia Publishing (SC), 2021
ISBN 1467100007, 9781467100007
Length 128 pages

Chapters:
01. The South Side “L”
02. The Lake Street “L”
03. The Metropolitan “L”
04. The Northwestern “L”
05. The Union Loop
06. Lost Equipment
07. Lost Interurbans
08. Lost Terminals
09. Lost… and Found

Each copy purchased here will be signed by the author, and you will also receive a bonus facsimile of a 1926 Chicago Rapid Transit Company map, with interesting facts about the “L” on the reverse side.

The price of $23.99 includes shipping within the United States.

For Shipping to US Addresses:

For Shipping to Canada:

For Shipping Elsewhere:

NEW DVD:

A Tribute to the North Shore Line

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the demise of the fabled North Shore Line interurban in January 2013, Jeffrey L. Wien and Bradley Criss made a very thorough and professional video presentation, covering the entire route between Chicago and Milwaukee and then some. Sadly, both men are gone now, but their work remains, making this video a tribute to them, as much as it is a tribute to the Chicago North Shore & Milwaukee.

Jeff drew on his own vast collections of movie films, both his own and others such as the late William C. Hoffman, wrote and gave the narration. Bradley acted as video editor, and added authentic sound effects from archival recordings of the North Shore Line.

It was always Jeff’s intention to make this video available to the public, but unfortunately, this did not happen in his lifetime. Now, as the caretakers of Jeff’s railfan legacy, we are proud to offer this excellent two-hour program to you for the first time. The result is a fitting tribute to what Jeff called his “Perpetual Adoration,” which was the name of a stop on the interurban.

Jeff was a wholehearted supporter of our activities, and the proceeds from the sale of this disc will help defray some of the expenses of keeping the Trolley Dodger web site going.

Total time – 121:22

# of Discs – 1
Price: $19.99 (Includes shipping within the United States)

Help Support The Trolley Dodger

This is our 288th post, and we are gradually creating a body of work and an online resource for the benefit of all railfans, everywhere. To date, we have received over 869,000 page views, for which we are very grateful.

You can help us continue our original transit research by checking out the fine products in our Online Store.
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Your financial contributions help make this web site better, and are greatly appreciated.


Work, Work, Work

This remarkable photo, taken circa 1955-57, shows a wooden CTA "L" car on the Stock Yards branch with cattle, and in color to boot. We are looking east from the Exchange station.

This remarkable photo, taken circa 1955-57, shows a wooden CTA “L” car on the Stock Yards branch with cattle, and in color to boot. We are looking east from the Exchange station.

It’s been a month since our last post, but it hasn’t been for lack of effort. Lately, it’s been work, work, work around here. We have been hard at work on our next book, which will be about the North Shore Line, doing research, scanning, and collecting images.

We also have many new photo finds of our own, including 24 snapshots that we purchased as a batch. The photographer is not known, but must have been someone who traveled a lot, as there are pictures from Chicago, the Pittsburgh area, Milwaukee, and one other unidentified city.

The Pittsburgh photos are intriguing, as some of them appear to show the Pittsburgh Railways  interurban to Washington, PA, which ran PCC cars. There are some mysteries about the Milwaukee pictures as well.

Perhaps some of our readers can help identify the locations.

We received another batch of negatives from John V. Engleman, many of which are 60 years old, and have scanned a few dozen of these, mostly from the North Shore Line. Mr. Engleman is an excellent photographer and like the other photos of his we have shared in previous posts, there are many great shots, both black-and-white and color.

According to Mr. Engleman, he rode the North Shore Line twice– first in the summer of 1961, and then on the last full day of service, January 20, 1963. The extreme difference in weather should make it easy to tell which photos are which.

60-year-old color negatives present many challenges when scanning. The film has a base coat which has itself faded, just as the other colors in the image have, and it took a bit longer than usual to color correct these.

Then, there were the inevitable plethora of scratches and spots that had to be painstakingly removed using Photoshop. Working over each one of those images took me at least an hour, and sometimes longer. I could only do a few of these each day.

The color negs were 127 size, which is about four times as large as 35mm. So while early 1960s color negative film was grainy, the larger film size makes up for this to some extent, and the results are quite acceptable.

Mr. Engleman’s black-and-whites were shot on 120 film, which is even larger than 127, and presented no difficulties. We thank him profusely for generously sharing these previously unseen photos with our readers.

If a picture is worth 1000 words, then I say let these pictures speak for themselves. To me, they speak volumes.

Keep those cards and letters coming in, folks.

-David Sadowski

PS- You might also like our Trolley Dodger Facebook auxiliary, a private group that now has 713 members.

Our friend Kenneth Gear now has a Facebook group for the Railroad Record Club. If you enjoy listening to audio recordings of classic railroad trains, whether steam, electric, or diesel, you might consider joining.

Remembering Don Ross

It’s come to my attention that R. Donald Ross passed away on January 18th, aged 90. His career as a railfan photographer and historian began in 1946, and stretched out for more than 75 years. He cast a long shadow.

He started out as an avid photographer, and occasionally I will run across one with his name stamped on the back. But he was also an early, and active volunteer at railway museums, and scouted out possible locations for the Illinois Railway Museum when they had to vacate from the Chicago Hardware Foundry site in North Chicago.

He helped identify the former Elgin and Belvedere interurban right-of-way in Union as a potential site for the museum, where it is today. Other potential sites included the Chicago Aurora & Elgin‘s former Batavia branch, and the current sites of both the Fox River Trolley Museum and East Troy Railroad Museum.

In recent years, he worked hard at developing Don’s Rail Photos, a vast resource for information about hundreds of different railroads. This was not his only web site, as his interests ranged far afield.

I have not found an obituary for Mr. Ross. Nowadays, it doesn’t seem like everyone gets one. I don’t know what sort of provisions he made to continue his web site in the future, but it would be a shame if everything he worked so hard to create eventually disappears.

He will definitely be missed.

-David Sadowski

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Photos by John V. Engleman

Silverliners at the Milwaukee terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Silverliners at the Milwaukee terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Silverliners at the Milwaukee terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Silverliners at the Milwaukee terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A great night shot of an Electroliner at Roosevelt Road in Chicago. This was the southern terminus for the North Shore Line for many years, and from 1949 to 1963 the interurban had this CTA station all to themselves. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A great night shot of an Electroliner at Roosevelt Road in Chicago. This was the southern terminus for the North Shore Line for many years, and from 1949 to 1963 the interurban had this CTA station all to themselves. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A rather blurry shot of an Electroliner at Roosevelt Road. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A rather blurry shot of an Electroliner at Roosevelt Road. (John V. Engleman Photo)

This is North Chicago. (John V. Engleman Photo)

This is North Chicago. (John V. Engleman Photo)

This is North Chicago. (John V. Engleman Photo)

This is North Chicago. (John V. Engleman Photo)

This has been identified as North Chicago. (John V. Engleman Photo)

This has been identified as North Chicago. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A stately Electroliner on a snowy day in Milwaukee. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A stately Electroliner on a snowy day in Milwaukee. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Roosevelt Road with car 255 in the pocket. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Roosevelt Road with car 255 in the pocket. (John V. Engleman Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9648 heads west, as seen from the Belmont "L" station. (John V. Engleman Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9648 heads west, as seen from the Belmont “L” station. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A great shot of an Electroliner at Roosevelt Road on a winter's day. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A great shot of an Electroliner at Roosevelt Road on a winter’s day. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Roosevelt Road. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Roosevelt Road. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Although this image was spoiled by a double exposure, it is still a nice view of the Milwaukee Terminal in winter. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Although this image was spoiled by a double exposure, it is still a nice view of the Milwaukee Terminal in winter. (John V. Engleman Photo)

An Electroliner at the Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

An Electroliner at the Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Here. we are looking north from the Belmont "L" station, and the platform at left was used only by southbound North Shore trains. As Graham Garfield's www.chicago-l.org website notes, "Beginning in 1919, North Shore Line interurban trains reached downtown Chicago over the North Side "L". Although the "L" and interurban services were separate and had different fares without free transfers, they shared a number of stops -- Belmont being one common stop -- with little effort to separate passengers. This was in large part because the North Shore Line and the "L" were both owned by common interests, led by Samuel Insull. This ended in 1947 when the CTA assumed ownership and operation of the "L", and thereafter the Authority was disinclined to allow free transfer of North Shore Line riders to the "L". Thus, from 1953 until the end of North Shore Line service in 1963, Belmont actually had three platforms: there was an additional very narrow North Shore Line exit-only platform built along the west side of the "L" structure, extending from the south side of Belmont Avenue to a point somewhat north of the ends of the center platforms. (Traffic-separation arrangements were also adopted at Howard and Wilson, but never at the other stations used by inbound North Shore trains.) Passengers could disembark on this platform only, and were deposited onto the sidewalk on Belmont. If they wanted to transfer to the "L", they had to reenter the station and pay another fare. Northbound North Shore Line trains continued to share the island platform used by "L" customers, although there was probably more boarding of the interurban northbound than alighting, and the North Shore Line had personnel aboard their trains to collect fares at all times." (John V. Engleman Photo)

Here. we are looking north from the Belmont “L” station, and the platform at left was used only by southbound North Shore trains.
As Graham Garfield’s http://www.chicago-l.org website notes, “Beginning in 1919, North Shore Line interurban trains reached downtown Chicago over the North Side “L”. Although the “L” and interurban services were separate and had different fares without free transfers, they shared a number of stops — Belmont being one common stop — with little effort to separate passengers. This was in large part because the North Shore Line and the “L” were both owned by common interests, led by Samuel Insull. This ended in 1947 when the CTA assumed ownership and operation of the “L”, and thereafter the Authority was disinclined to allow free transfer of North Shore Line riders to the “L”. Thus, from 1953 until the end of North Shore Line service in 1963, Belmont actually had three platforms: there was an additional very narrow North Shore Line exit-only platform built along the west side of the “L” structure, extending from the south side of Belmont Avenue to a point somewhat north of the ends of the center platforms. (Traffic-separation arrangements were also adopted at Howard and Wilson, but never at the other stations used by inbound North Shore trains.) Passengers could disembark on this platform only, and were deposited onto the sidewalk on Belmont. If they wanted to transfer to the “L”, they had to reenter the station and pay another fare. Northbound North Shore Line trains continued to share the island platform used by “L” customers, although there was probably more boarding of the interurban northbound than alighting, and the North Shore Line had personnel aboard their trains to collect fares at all times.” (John V. Engleman Photo)

NSL 771 and train are heading east at LaSalle and Van Buren on the Loop "L", making this a southbound train in the morning. (John V. Engleman Photo)

NSL 771 and train are heading east at LaSalle and Van Buren on the Loop “L”, making this a southbound train in the morning. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A Silverliner at the head of a train. Not sure of the location. (John V. Engleman Photo) Zach E. says this is 769 at Lake Bluff.

A Silverliner at the head of a train. Not sure of the location. (John V. Engleman Photo) Zach E. says this is 769 at Lake Bluff.

The Mundelein Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The Mundelein Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

NSL 743 is northbound on the 6th Street Viaduct. (John V. Engleman Photo)

NSL 743 is northbound on the 6th Street Viaduct. (John V. Engleman Photo)

North Shore Line Silverliners at the Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

North Shore Line Silverliners at the Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A southbound Silverliner at Belmont. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A southbound Silverliner at Belmont. (John V. Engleman Photo)

An Electroliner has arrived and its trolley pole hasn't yet been turned around. (John V. Engleman Photo)

An Electroliner has arrived and its trolley pole hasn’t yet been turned around. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Such a classic view of the Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Such a classic view of the Milwaukee Terminal.
(John V. Engleman Photo)

An Electroliner at the Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

An Electroliner at the Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The Milwaukee Terminal. This picture, at least, could have been taken in 1962, judging by the nearby billboard. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The Milwaukee Terminal. This picture, at least, could have been taken in 1962, judging by the nearby billboard. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Red Pullman 460 at South Shops, as part of the CTA historical collection, possibly after the end of streetcar service, which ended in 1958. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Red Pullman 460 at South Shops, as part of the CTA historical collection, possibly after the end of streetcar service, which ended in 1958. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Prewar PCC 4021 and red Pullman 460 were part of the CTA's historical collection when this picture was taken at South Shops, possibly around 1959. Both cars are now at the Illinois Railway Museum. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Prewar PCC 4021 and red Pullman 460 were part of the CTA’s historical collection when this picture was taken at South Shops, possibly around 1959. Both cars are now at the Illinois Railway Museum. (John V. Engleman Photo)

This was scanned from a copy negative of an Electroliner in action. (John V. Engleman Collection)

This was scanned from a copy negative of an Electroliner in action. (John V. Engleman Collection)

The CTA Skokie Swift opened in April 1964, and it's possible this picture was taken not long after that at Dempster Street in Skokie. (John V. Engleman Photo) Spence Ziegler adds, "The Skokie Swift Car at Dempster St was taken after June, 1965 as the former North Shore Line catenary towers north of Dempster St. are gone."

The CTA Skokie Swift opened in April 1964, and it’s possible this picture was taken not long after that at Dempster Street in Skokie. (John V. Engleman Photo) Spence Ziegler adds, “The Skokie Swift Car at Dempster St was taken after June, 1965 as the former North Shore Line catenary towers north of Dempster St. are gone.”

It's not entirely clear just when this picture was taken at DesPlaines Avenue on the Congress line, but my guess is 1960-61. There are some CTA single-car units visible, and the first of these were delivered in 1960. But in this and the other shot, I don't see the shops building, which was completed in 1962. We are looking west, with the old Forest Park gas holder in the distance. (John V. Engleman Photo)

It’s not entirely clear just when this picture was taken at DesPlaines Avenue on the Congress line, but my guess is 1960-61. There are some CTA single-car units visible, and the first of these were delivered in 1960. But in this and the other shot, I don’t see the shops building, which was completed in 1962. We are looking west, with the old Forest Park gas holder in the distance. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The yard at the DesPlaines Avenue terminal, circa 1960-61. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The yard at the DesPlaines Avenue terminal, circa 1960-61. (John V. Engleman Photo)

CTA 5002 at Kimball in Lawrence, most likely in June 1962 (based on the platform signage). (John V. Engleman Photo)

CTA 5002 at Kimball in Lawrence, most likely in June 1962 (based on the platform signage). (John V. Engleman Photo)

CSL PCC 4050 is at Madison and Austin, and appears to have some front-end damage. The motorman does not look too happy about having his picture taken. (John V. Engleman Collection)

CSL PCC 4050 is at Madison and Austin, and appears to have some front-end damage. The motorman does not look too happy about having his picture taken. (John V. Engleman Collection)

CTA PCC 4110 exits the Washington streetcar tunnel in the early 1950s, with a Chicago Motor Coach bus at left. We are looking west. (John V. Engleman Collection)

CTA PCC 4110 exits the Washington streetcar tunnel in the early 1950s, with a Chicago Motor Coach bus at left. We are looking west. (John V. Engleman Collection)

The same location today. Note the building on the left matches.

The same location today. Note the building on the left matches.

Recent Finds

This is a North Shore Line city streetcar in Milwaukee. The caption that came with this one said, "Last day run past North Shore depot." If so, this would be 1951.

This is a North Shore Line city streetcar in Milwaukee. The caption that came with this one said, “Last day run past North Shore depot.” If so, this would be 1951.

CTA wooden "L" cars 390 and 280 make a fantrip photo stop at Austin Boulevard on the Garfield Park line on April 14, 1957. This was a temporary station due to ongoing construction of the Congress Expressway in this area.

CTA wooden “L” cars 390 and 280 make a fantrip photo stop at Austin Boulevard on the Garfield Park line on April 14, 1957. This was a temporary station due to ongoing construction of the Congress Expressway in this area.

North Shore Line car 154 survived the abandonment, only to succumb to the ravages of neglect many years later. Here, we see it in Anderson, IN on July 16, 1965, where it was pulled around by a locomotive. It eventually went to a museum in Worthington, OH where it was allowed to deteriorate. Considered in too bad shape to restore, it was purchased by another museum in Michigan, stripped of usable parts for the restoration of a different (non-NSL) car in their collection, and its carcass was unceremoniously dumped in a field, where it is now offered to anyone in need of a spare room or chicken coop.

North Shore Line car 154 survived the abandonment, only to succumb to the ravages of neglect many years later. Here, we see it in Anderson, IN on July 16, 1965, where it was pulled around by a locomotive. It eventually went to a museum in Worthington, OH where it was allowed to deteriorate. Considered in too bad shape to restore, it was purchased by another museum in Michigan, stripped of usable parts for the restoration of a different (non-NSL) car in their collection, and its carcass was unceremoniously dumped in a field, where it is now offered to anyone in need of a spare room or chicken coop.

From 1922 to 1938, North Shore Line cars ran to the south side. Here, we see a fantrip train, headed up by Silverliner 409, at 61st Street on one of those latter-day fantrips prior to the 1963 abandonment.

From 1922 to 1938, North Shore Line cars ran to the south side. Here, we see a fantrip train, headed up by Silverliner 409, at 61st Street on one of those latter-day fantrips prior to the 1963 abandonment.

CTA red Pullman streetcar 208 appears to be signed for Route 9 - Ashland, which would make this a car headed east between Paulina and Ashland, where it will turn north. Streetcars were not permitted on boulevards, which meant they could not travel on Ashland between Lake Street and Roosevelt Road. Buses replaced streetcars on the Ashland and Lake routes in 1954. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

CTA red Pullman streetcar 208 appears to be signed for Route 9 – Ashland, which would make this a car headed east between Paulina and Ashland, where it will turn north. Streetcars were not permitted on boulevards, which meant they could not travel on Ashland between Lake Street and Roosevelt Road. Buses replaced streetcars on the Ashland and Lake routes in 1954. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

CTA PCC 7240, signed for 77th and Vincennes (South Shops). (William C. Hoffman Photo) Mike Franklin: "Car 7240 is e/b on 69th St at Morgan St." Our resident South Side expert M.E. adds: "This photo needs further explanation. For many years, the 69th and Ashland barn housed Western Avenue PCC cars. After that barn closed in the early 1950s, the only remaining carbarn for PCC cars on the south side was at 77th and Vincennes. The CTA left the trackage alive on 69th St. between Western and Wentworth for the sole purpose of moving Western Avenue PCCs back and forth. (Trackage along Wentworth and Vincennes was still in use by route 22.) The car in this photo is heading home to the 77th and Vincennes barn."

CTA PCC 7240, signed for 77th and Vincennes (South Shops). (William C. Hoffman Photo) Mike Franklin: “Car 7240 is e/b on 69th St at Morgan St.” Our resident South Side expert M.E. adds: “This photo needs further explanation. For many years, the 69th and Ashland barn housed Western Avenue PCC cars. After that barn closed in the early 1950s, the only remaining carbarn for PCC cars on the south side was at 77th and Vincennes. The CTA left the trackage alive on 69th St. between Western and Wentworth for the sole purpose of moving Western Avenue PCCs back and forth. (Trackage along Wentworth and Vincennes was still in use by route 22.) The car in this photo is heading home to the 77th and Vincennes barn.”

CTA PCC 7180 is northbound on Dearborn at Congress in the mid-1950s.

CTA PCC 7180 is northbound on Dearborn at Congress in the mid-1950s.

The Garfield Park "L" temporary trackage at street level in Van Bure Street at Damen Avenue, some time around 1954 as the Congress Expressway is still under construction nearby (but the old "L" structure has already been removed).

The Garfield Park “L” temporary trackage at street level in Van Bure Street at Damen Avenue, some time around 1954 as the Congress Expressway is still under construction nearby (but the old “L” structure has already been removed).

The same location. A Buick heads south on Damen while an eastbound Garfield Park train waits for the lights to change before crossing.

The same location. A Buick heads south on Damen while an eastbound Garfield Park train waits for the lights to change before crossing.

North Shore Line 742 and a Silverliner at the Milwaukee Terminal in the early-to-mid 1950s.

North Shore Line 742 and a Silverliner at the Milwaukee Terminal in the early-to-mid 1950s.

This CTA preliminary study, circa 1954-55, shows plans for the Congress-Douglas-Milwaukee route that went into service in 1958. Planning for the section west of Cicero was somewhat tentative and differed from what was eventually built. At this stage, Laramie Yard was to be retained, and connected to the Congress line via a flyover. Eventually, it was decided to move the yard to DesPlaines Avenue, but at the time the land was not owned by the CTA. A platform area on the map at Laramie was not a station, but intended for use adding and cutting cars. The Austin-Menard station would have been located east of Austin Boulevard. Instead, it was built west of there, with a secondary entrance at Lombard. Once it was decided to add a secondary entrance to the Oak Park Avenue station at East Avenue, it was no longer necessary to have a new station at Ridgeland (as a replacement for Gunderson, which was located on a side street). During construction of the Congress Expressway in Oak Park and Forest Park, there were eventually three different temporary track configurations used.

This CTA preliminary study, circa 1954-55, shows plans for the Congress-Douglas-Milwaukee route that went into service in 1958. Planning for the section west of Cicero was somewhat tentative and differed from what was eventually built. At this stage, Laramie Yard was to be retained, and connected to the Congress line via a flyover. Eventually, it was decided to move the yard to DesPlaines Avenue, but at the time the land was not owned by the CTA. A platform area on the map at Laramie was not a station, but intended for use adding and cutting cars. The Austin-Menard station would have been located east of Austin Boulevard. Instead, it was built west of there, with a secondary entrance at Lombard. Once it was decided to add a secondary entrance to the Oak Park Avenue station at East Avenue, it was no longer necessary to have a new station at Ridgeland (as a replacement for Gunderson, which was located on a side street). During construction of the Congress Expressway in Oak Park and Forest Park, there were eventually three different temporary track configurations used.

A northbound NSL two-car train stops at Dempster Street in Skokie on March 26, 1960.

A northbound NSL two-car train stops at Dempster Street in Skokie on March 26, 1960.

North Shore Line conventional cars and an Electroliner meet at Edison Court in Waukegan on August 31, 1957. (Stephen D. Maguire Photo)

North Shore Line conventional cars and an Electroliner meet at Edison Court in Waukegan on August 31, 1957. (Stephen D. Maguire Photo)

On June 19, 1953, a three-car Chicago Auror and Elgin train approaches the Halsted "L" station in the four-track Met main line. We are looking to the northeast. The cars are 52, 317, and 304. (Robert Selle Photo)

On June 19, 1953, a three-car Chicago Auror and Elgin train approaches the Halsted “L” station in the four-track Met main line. We are looking to the northeast. The cars are 52, 317, and 304. (Robert Selle Photo)

Chicago Aurora and Elgin wood car 139 at Wheaton Yards on May 30, 1952. Don's Rail Photos: "138 thru 141 were built by American Car in 1910. They were rebuilt for Elevated compatibility in 1919. They were also leased to the CA&E in 1936, returned to the CNS&M in 1945, and sold to the CA&E in 1946." Once the CA&E stopped running downtown via CTA tracks in September 1953, the former North Shore cars were no longer needed and were scrapped the following year. (Robert Selle Photo)

Chicago Aurora and Elgin wood car 139 at Wheaton Yards on May 30, 1952. Don’s Rail Photos: “138 thru 141 were built by American Car in 1910. They were rebuilt for Elevated compatibility in 1919. They were also leased to the CA&E in 1936, returned to the CNS&M in 1945, and sold to the CA&E in 1946.” Once the CA&E stopped running downtown via CTA tracks in September 1953, the former North Shore cars were no longer needed and were scrapped the following year. (Robert Selle Photo)

CA&E car 129 at the Wheaton Yards on May 30, 1952. Don's Rail Photos: "129 was built by Jewett Car in 1907. It was rebuilt in 1914 and leased to Chicago Aurora & Elgin and modified in 1936. It was returned to CNS&M in 1945 and sold to CA&E in 1946. It was scrapped in 1951." (Note- the scrapping date is in error.) (Robert Selle Photo)

CA&E car 129 at the Wheaton Yards on May 30, 1952. Don’s Rail Photos: “129 was built by Jewett Car in 1907. It was rebuilt in 1914 and leased to Chicago Aurora & Elgin and modified in 1936. It was returned to CNS&M in 1945 and sold to CA&E in 1946. It was scrapped in 1951.” (Note- the scrapping date is in error.) (Robert Selle Photo)

CA&E wood car 318 is outbound on the Batavia branch on July 14, 1954, about one block from the Batavia station, on its way to Batavia Junction. Parts of the Batavia branch were somewhat similar to the main line at the Illinois Railway Museum, which you can see in this photo by Robert Selle. As with the rest of the CA&E, passenger service continued until the abrupt mid-day abandonment on July 3, 1957.

CA&E wood car 318 is outbound on the Batavia branch on July 14, 1954, about one block from the Batavia station, on its way to Batavia Junction. Parts of the Batavia branch were somewhat similar to the main line at the Illinois Railway Museum, which you can see in this photo by Robert Selle. As with the rest of the CA&E, passenger service continued until the abrupt mid-day abandonment on July 3, 1957.

CA&E cars 406 and 456 meet to pick up and discharge passengers at the Cicero Avenue station on the Garfield Park "L" on August 22, 1953, just less than a month before the interurban cut back service to Forest Park. (Robert Selle Photo)

CA&E cars 406 and 456 meet to pick up and discharge passengers at the Cicero Avenue station on the Garfield Park “L” on August 22, 1953, just less than a month before the interurban cut back service to Forest Park. (Robert Selle Photo)

CA&E car 418 is east of Laramie Avenue on the Garfield Park "L" on February 15, 1953, giving an unusual view of the ramp leading from ground level to the Cicero Avenue station. The middle part of the negative was partially light struck, which could happen with paper-backed roll film. Photographer Robert Selle shot size 616 Kodak Verichrome Pan film. 616 used the same film as 116, resulting in a large negative, but used slightly different spools. Both types were discontinued in 1984, as no cameras had been manufactured using these sizes in decades. Verichrome was designed to give maximum exposure latitude, as it was often used in box cameras that had only one shutter speed. It was discontinued in 2002.

CA&E car 418 is east of Laramie Avenue on the Garfield Park “L” on February 15, 1953, giving an unusual view of the ramp leading from ground level to the Cicero Avenue station. The middle part of the negative was partially light struck, which could happen with paper-backed roll film. Photographer Robert Selle shot size 616 Kodak Verichrome Pan film. 616 used the same film as 116, resulting in a large negative, but used slightly different spools. Both types were discontinued in 1984, as no cameras had been manufactured using these sizes in decades. Verichrome was designed to give maximum exposure latitude, as it was often used in box cameras that had only one shutter speed. It was discontinued in 2002.

Chicago Surface Lines one-man car 3100. Mike Franklin: "This would be looking north on Leavitt St from just south of Coulter St. Small building above Car 3100 is Chicago Railways Blue Island Ave Sub Station and the larger building further north is their 24th St Car Station."

Chicago Surface Lines one-man car 3100. Mike Franklin: “This would be looking north on Leavitt St from just south of Coulter St. Small building above Car 3100 is Chicago Railways Blue Island Ave Sub Station and the larger building further north is their 24th St Car Station.”

A Silverliner departs from the North Shore Line's Milwaukee Terminal, probably in the late 1950s. I can't quite make out the number, but it is in the 770s.

A Silverliner departs from the North Shore Line’s Milwaukee Terminal, probably in the late 1950s. I can’t quite make out the number, but it is in the 770s.

The North Shore Line shops at Highwood. Loco 456 pulls a freight train, while one of the line cars is at right.

The North Shore Line shops at Highwood. Loco 456 pulls a freight train, while one of the line cars is at right.

NSL 157 on a June 17, 1962 fantrip.

NSL 157 on a June 17, 1962 fantrip.

I recently purchased these three Ektachrome slides, all taken by the same photographer on June 17, 1962. Ektachrome film from the 1950s through the early 1960s has faded to red over the years. The red dye layer remained stable, while the other colors faded badly. Within a year or two of when these pictures were taken, Kodak had fixed the problem. With modern technology, it is often possible to bring the color back in these red Ektachromes, and restore them to look more like normal. The color-corrected versions follow.