Autumn Leaves

North Shore Line Silverliner 737 (at left) and "Greenliner" 767 (at right) prepare to leave the Milwaukee Terminal on May 24, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line Silverliner 737 (at left) and “Greenliner” 767 (at right) prepare to leave the Milwaukee Terminal on May 24, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

Seasons change and Fall is here. Today’s post features classic images from two excellent photographers, Robert A. Selle (1929-2013) and Charles L. Tauscher (1940-2017). Selle was a master of black-and-white photography, while Tauscher shot Kodachrome slides in his prime.

We spent a lot of time working these slides over in Photoshop, making them look their best for you. Some required a lot of cleaning.

Lastly, we have some interesting historical CTA documents to share. Going back to the original source can often shed light on past events.

Keep those cards and letters coming in, folks.

-David Sadowski

New Book Update

FYI we recently turned in a second draft of our upcoming book The North Shore Line to Arcadia Publishing. I am pleased to report that the book has been expanded to 160 pages (from 128), a 25% increase. A publication date of February 20, 2023 has been announced, and we will begin our pre-sale on November 20 of this year.

PS- You might also like our Trolley Dodger Facebook auxiliary, a private group that now has 974 members.

Our friend Kenneth Gear now has a Facebook group for the Railroad Record Club. If you enjoy listening to audio recordings of classic railroad trains, whether steam, electric, or diesel, you might consider joining.

Indiana Railroad cars 446, 737, and 68 in Indianapolis, IN on June 3, 1938.

Indiana Railroad cars 446, 737, and 68 in Indianapolis, IN on June 3, 1938.

FYI, we are in the process of assisting with the creation of a new Facebook group called Hoosier Traction, which will be formally announced in the near future.

The Hoosier Traction Facebook Group will celebrate electric transit in Indiana and the Midwest, and also support the activities of the annual Hoosier Traction Meet in Dayton, OH (although not affiliated with the North American Transit Historical Society, which organizes that event).

The North Shore Line (nearly all by Robert A. Selle)

North Shore Line car 162 is at the rear of a northbound train at Chicago Avenue on June 30, 1958. This car is now the oldest survivor of the fleet, and recently arrived at East Troy, where it will be restored. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 162 is at the rear of a northbound train at Chicago Avenue on June 30, 1958. This car is now the oldest survivor of the fleet, and recently arrived at East Troy, where it will be restored. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line tool car 234 (a former Merchandise Despatch car) at Edison Court in Waukegan on August 2, 1958. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line tool car 234 (a former Merchandise Despatch car) at Edison Court in Waukegan on August 2, 1958. (Robert Selle Photo)

A view of the abandoned Shore Line Route and the crossover to the Chicago Hardware Foundry Company in North Chicago in April 1956. (Robert Selle Photo)

A view of the abandoned Shore Line Route and the crossover to the Chicago Hardware Foundry Company in North Chicago in April 1956. (Robert Selle Photo)

A view of the abandoned Shore Line Route in North Chicago in April 1956. (Robert Selle Photo)

A view of the abandoned Shore Line Route in North Chicago in April 1956. (Robert Selle Photo)

A view of the abandoned Shore Line Route in North Chicago in April 1956. (Robert Selle Photo)

A view of the abandoned Shore Line Route in North Chicago in April 1956. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line caboose 1005 at North Chicago in June, 1939. (Richard J. Anderson Photo)

North Shore Line caboose 1005 at North Chicago in June, 1939. (Richard J. Anderson Photo)

North Shore Line caboose 1004 at North Chicago on September 17, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line caboose 1004 at North Chicago on September 17, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

Former North Shore Line Merchandise Despatch car 213 at North Chicago (Chicago Hardware Foundry Company) on August 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

Former North Shore Line Merchandise Despatch car 213 at North Chicago (Chicago Hardware Foundry Company) on August 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

Newly painted North Shore Line caboose 1003 at North Chicago on January 19, 1957. (Robert Selle Photo)

Newly painted North Shore Line caboose 1003 at North Chicago on January 19, 1957. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line caboose 1002 at North Chicago on January 19, 1957. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line caboose 1002 at North Chicago on January 19, 1957. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 419 is at the Highwood Shops on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 419 is at the Highwood Shops on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 444 at the Highwood Shops on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 444 at the Highwood Shops on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 169 in Mundelein on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 169 in Mundelein on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 735 is at the Mundelein Yards on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 735 is at the Mundelein Yards on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 150 is on the rear end of a northbound train at Chicago Avenue on June 3, 1959. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 150 is on the rear end of a northbound train at Chicago Avenue on June 3, 1959. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line diner/lounge car 417 is at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line diner/lounge car 417 is at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line Silverliner 764 is on a side track at Edison Court in Waukegan on July 26, 1958. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line Silverliner 764 is on a side track at Edison Court in Waukegan on July 26, 1958. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 169 is on a side track at Edison Court in Waukegan on July 9, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 169 is on a side track at Edison Court in Waukegan on July 9, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 190, which had recently been damaged by fire, at the Highwood Shops on August 27, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line car 190, which had recently been damaged by fire, at the Highwood Shops on August 27, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line steeple cab loco 452 (with 453 at left) at Great Lakes Naval Station, on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line steeple cab loco 452 (with 453 at left) at Great Lakes Naval Station, on August 9, 1953. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line loco 459 at the Pettibone Shops in North Chicago on October 23, 1954. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line loco 459 at the Pettibone Shops in North Chicago on October 23, 1954. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line tool car 234 at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line tool car 234 at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line line car 606 at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line line car 606 at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line line car 604 at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

North Shore Line line car 604 at the Highwood Shops on February 20, 1955. (Robert Selle Photo)

Chicago Transit Authority Buses by Charles L. Tauscher

CTA trolley bus 9410 is westbound on Montrose Avenue in June 1961. Note the late 1940s Jeepster at left, and the mid-50s Chevy at right. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9410 is westbound on Montrose Avenue in June 1961. Note the late 1940s Jeepster at left, and the mid-50s Chevy at right. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9341 is southbound on Central Avenue at North Avenue in August 1965, at a time when a White Castle hamburger cost just 12 cents. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9341 is southbound on Central Avenue at North Avenue in August 1965, at a time when a White Castle hamburger cost just 12 cents. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

The same location in 2019. There is still a White Castle on the corner, off to the left, but the building in the previous photo has been replaced by a newer one just out of view.

The same location in 2019. There is still a White Castle on the corner, off to the left, but the building in the previous photo has been replaced by a newer one just out of view.

CTA trolley bus 9287 is turning from North Avenue onto Narragansett Avenue in September 1962, so it can go into the off-street loop. It's possible that the man on the corner looking down may be the late William C. Hoffman. The Terminal Grill is long gone, but this loop is still used by CTA buses. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9287 is turning from North Avenue onto Narragansett Avenue in September 1962, so it can go into the off-street loop. It’s possible that the man on the corner looking down may be the late William C. Hoffman. The Terminal Grill is long gone, but this loop is still used by CTA buses.
(Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

The same location in 2021. A Dunkin Donuts has replaced the diner grill. Midas Muffler is still there, down the street at the corner of North Avenue and Ridgeland Avenue in Oak Park. The off-street loop is in Chicago.

The same location in 2021. A Dunkin Donuts has replaced the diner grill. Midas Muffler is still there, down the street at the corner of North Avenue and Ridgeland Avenue in Oak Park. The off-street loop is in Chicago.

CTA 9746 at an unidentified location in April 1963. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9746 at an unidentified location in April 1963. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9502 is southbound on Central Avenue at Bloomingdale (1800 N.) in 1969. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9502 is southbound on Central Avenue at Bloomingdale (1800 N.) in 1969. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

The same location today. The bridge has been replaced since the previous photo.

The same location today. The bridge has been replaced since the previous photo.

This is most likely CTA trolley bus 9631 on the April 1, 1973 Omnibus Society of America fantrip that closed out trolley bus service in Chicago. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

This is most likely CTA trolley bus 9631 on the April 1, 1973 Omnibus Society of America fantrip that closed out trolley bus service in Chicago. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9761 in 1973. This may be on a fantrip. I'm thinking the location may be at Belmont and Kimball, but the side sign says Montrose. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9761 in 1973. This may be on a fantrip. I’m thinking the location may be at Belmont and Kimball, but the side sign says Montrose. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9761 on a 1973 fantrip. Can this be somewhere along Belmont Avenue? (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9761 on a 1973 fantrip. Can this be somewhere along Belmont Avenue? (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9761 at an unidentified location on a 1973 fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9761 at an unidentified location on a 1973 fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley buses in dead storage some time after the end of service in 1973. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley buses in dead storage some time after the end of service in 1973. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9325 is westbound on Irving Park Road in September 1968. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9325 is westbound on Irving Park Road in September 1968. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9708 at an unidentified location in August 1965. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9708 at an unidentified location in August 1965. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9708 at an unidentified location in August 1965. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9708 at an unidentified location in August 1965. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9761 is signed for Route 80 - Irving Park Road in 1969, but the actual location seems to be Central Avenue not far south from Fullerton, so this may be a fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9761 is signed for Route 80 – Irving Park Road in 1969, but the actual location seems to be Central Avenue not far south from Fullerton, so this may be a fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9545 is signed for 47th Street in August 1965. Not sure of the actual location, however. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9545 is signed for 47th Street in August 1965. Not sure of the actual location, however. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9308 has just crossed over the Chicago River on North Avenue on May 15, 1962. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9308 has just crossed over the Chicago River on North Avenue on May 15, 1962. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 2583 is westbound on 103rd Street at Vincennes Avenue in May 1960. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 2583 is westbound on 103rd Street at Vincennes Avenue in May 1960. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9300 is southbound on Central Avenue in July 1969. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9300 is southbound on Central Avenue in July 1969. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

We can infer from this July 1968 photo that CTA trolley bus 9537 could not go through the northbound side of the viaduct under the Chicago and North Western tracks on Central Avenue at Lake Street. There must have been some sort of obstruction. The bus is being pushed so that it can get back to the northbound side of the street where it can be re-wired. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

We can infer from this July 1968 photo that CTA trolley bus 9537 could not go through the northbound side of the viaduct under the Chicago and North Western tracks on Central Avenue at Lake Street. There must have been some sort of obstruction. The bus is being pushed so that it can get back to the northbound side of the street where it can be re-wired. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9761 is northbound at Central Avenue at North Avenue on a 1973 fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9761 is northbound at Central Avenue at North Avenue on a 1973 fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9761 is northbound at Central Avenue at North Avenue on a 1973 fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9761 is northbound at Central Avenue at North Avenue on a 1973 fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9670 and 3534 are at an unidentified location in June 1961. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9670 and 3534 are at an unidentified location in June 1961. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9670 and 3534 are at an unidentified location in June 1961. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 9670 and 3534 are at an unidentified location in June 1961. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 3534 and 9389 are at Irving Park Road and Neenah in June 1961. This off-street loop was as far west as trolley buses went on Irving Park. This loop was later decommissioned and part of it is now used as a private driveway. 3534 is on a fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 3534 and 9389 are at Irving Park Road and Neenah in June 1961. This off-street loop was as far west as trolley buses went on Irving Park. This loop was later decommissioned and part of it is now used as a private driveway. 3534 is on a fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 3534 and 9389 are at Irving Park Road and Neenah in June 1961. This off-street loop was as far west as trolley buses went on Irving Park. This loop was later decommissioned and part of it is now used as a private driveway. 3534 is on a fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

CTA 3534 and 9389 are at Irving Park Road and Neenah in June 1961. This off-street loop was as far west as trolley buses went on Irving Park. This loop was later decommissioned and part of it is now used as a private driveway. 3534 is on a fantrip. (Charles L. Tauscher Photo)

\

Historical CTA Documents

Who can say why some things are kept, while others are destroyed? These historical documents form a paper trail that helps inform our understanding of the past.

Mystery CERA Document

In 2014, I compiled a data disc made up of the first 76 Central Electric Railfans’ Association Bulletins from 1938-47. I recently came across an early document that I had not seen before. Curiously, it is not one of the numbered bulletins, but is called “Circular 115.” Which gives rise to the question, were there really 114 previous circulars issued in the three years prior to this one? And if so, where are they and what happened to them?

Please note that the Trolley Dodger is not affiliated with Central Electric Railfans’ Association.

New Compact Disc, Now Available:

CTA-1
The Last Chicago Streetcars 1958
# of Discs – 1
Price: $15.99

Until now, it seemed as though audio recordings of Chicago streetcars were practically non-existent. For whatever reason, the late William A. Steventon does not appear to have made any for his Railroad Record Club, even though he did make other recordings in the Chicago area in 1956.

Now, audio recordings of the last runs of Chicago streetcars have been found, in the collections of the late Jeffrey L. Wien (who was one of the riders on that last car). We do not know who made these recordings, but this must have been done using a portable reel-to-reel machine.

These important recordings will finally fill a gap in transit history. The last Chicago Transit Authority streetcar finished its run in the early hours of June 21, 1958. Now you can experience these events just as Chicagoans did.

As a bonus, we have included Keeping Pace, a 1939 Chicago Surface Lines employee training program. This was digitally transferred from an original 16” transcription disc. These recordings were unheard for 80 years.

Total time – 74:38

Chicago’s Lost “L”s Online Presentation

We recently gave an online presentation about our book Chicago’s Lost “L”s for the Chicago Public Library, as part of their One Book, One Chicago series. You can watch it online by following this link.

The Trolley Dodger On the Air

We appeared on the Dave Plier Show on WGN radio on July 16, 2021, to discuss Chicago’s Lost “L”s. You can hear that discussion here.

Our Latest Book, Now Available:

Chicago’s Lost “L”s

From the back cover:

Chicago’s system of elevated railways, known locally as the “L,” has run continuously since 1892 and, like the city, has never stood still. It helped neighborhoods grow, brought their increasingly diverse populations together, and gave the famous Loop its name. But today’s system has changed radically over the years. Chicago’s Lost “L”s tells the story of former lines such as Garfield Park, Humboldt Park, Kenwood, Stockyards, Normal Park, Westchester, and Niles Center. It was once possible to take high-speed trains on the L directly to Aurora, Elgin, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The L started out as four different companies, two starting out using steam engines instead of electricity. Eventually, all four came together via the Union Loop. The L is more than a way of getting around. Its trains are a place where people meet and interact. Some say the best way to experience the city is via the L, with its second-story view. Chicago’s Lost “L”s is virtually a “secret history” of Chicago, and this is your ticket. David Sadowski grew up riding the L all over the city. He is the author of Chicago Trolleys and Building Chicago’s Subways and runs the online Trolley Dodger blog.

The Images of America series celebrates the history of neighborhoods, towns, and cities across the country. Using archival photographs, each title presents the distinctive stories from the past that shape the character of the community today. Arcadia is proud to play a part in the preservation of local heritage, making history available to all.

Title Chicago’s Lost “L”s
Images of America
Author David Sadowski
Edition illustrated
Publisher Arcadia Publishing (SC), 2021
ISBN 1467100007, 9781467100007
Length 128 pages

Chapters:
01. The South Side “L”
02. The Lake Street “L”
03. The Metropolitan “L”
04. The Northwestern “L”
05. The Union Loop
06. Lost Equipment
07. Lost Interurbans
08. Lost Terminals
09. Lost… and Found

Each copy purchased here will be signed by the author, and you will also receive a bonus facsimile of a 1926 Chicago Rapid Transit Company map, with interesting facts about the “L” on the reverse side.

The price of $23.99 includes shipping within the United States.

For Shipping to US Addresses:

For Shipping to Canada:

For Shipping Elsewhere:

Help Support The Trolley Dodger

This is our 292nd post, and we are gradually creating a body of work and an online resource for the benefit of all railfans, everywhere. To date, we have received over 915,000 page views, for which we are very grateful.

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Work, Work, Work

This remarkable photo, taken circa 1955-57, shows a wooden CTA "L" car on the Stock Yards branch with cattle, and in color to boot. We are looking east from the Exchange station.

This remarkable photo, taken circa 1955-57, shows a wooden CTA “L” car on the Stock Yards branch with cattle, and in color to boot. We are looking east from the Exchange station.

It’s been a month since our last post, but it hasn’t been for lack of effort. Lately, it’s been work, work, work around here. We have been hard at work on our next book, which will be about the North Shore Line, doing research, scanning, and collecting images.

We also have many new photo finds of our own, including 24 snapshots that we purchased as a batch. The photographer is not known, but must have been someone who traveled a lot, as there are pictures from Chicago, the Pittsburgh area, Milwaukee, and one other unidentified city.

The Pittsburgh photos are intriguing, as some of them appear to show the Pittsburgh Railways  interurban to Washington, PA, which ran PCC cars. There are some mysteries about the Milwaukee pictures as well.

Perhaps some of our readers can help identify the locations.

We received another batch of negatives from John V. Engleman, many of which are 60 years old, and have scanned a few dozen of these, mostly from the North Shore Line. Mr. Engleman is an excellent photographer and like the other photos of his we have shared in previous posts, there are many great shots, both black-and-white and color.

According to Mr. Engleman, he rode the North Shore Line twice– first in the summer of 1961, and then on the last full day of service, January 20, 1963. The extreme difference in weather should make it easy to tell which photos are which.

60-year-old color negatives present many challenges when scanning. The film has a base coat which has itself faded, just as the other colors in the image have, and it took a bit longer than usual to color correct these.

Then, there were the inevitable plethora of scratches and spots that had to be painstakingly removed using Photoshop. Working over each one of those images took me at least an hour, and sometimes longer. I could only do a few of these each day.

The color negs were 127 size, which is about four times as large as 35mm. So while early 1960s color negative film was grainy, the larger film size makes up for this to some extent, and the results are quite acceptable.

Mr. Engleman’s black-and-whites were shot on 120 film, which is even larger than 127, and presented no difficulties. We thank him profusely for generously sharing these previously unseen photos with our readers.

If a picture is worth 1000 words, then I say let these pictures speak for themselves. To me, they speak volumes.

Keep those cards and letters coming in, folks.

-David Sadowski

PS- You might also like our Trolley Dodger Facebook auxiliary, a private group that now has 713 members.

Our friend Kenneth Gear now has a Facebook group for the Railroad Record Club. If you enjoy listening to audio recordings of classic railroad trains, whether steam, electric, or diesel, you might consider joining.

Remembering Don Ross

It’s come to my attention that R. Donald Ross passed away on January 18th, aged 90. His career as a railfan photographer and historian began in 1946, and stretched out for more than 75 years. He cast a long shadow.

He started out as an avid photographer, and occasionally I will run across one with his name stamped on the back. But he was also an early, and active volunteer at railway museums, and scouted out possible locations for the Illinois Railway Museum when they had to vacate from the Chicago Hardware Foundry site in North Chicago.

He helped identify the former Elgin and Belvedere interurban right-of-way in Union as a potential site for the museum, where it is today. Other potential sites included the Chicago Aurora & Elgin‘s former Batavia branch, and the current sites of both the Fox River Trolley Museum and East Troy Railroad Museum.

In recent years, he worked hard at developing Don’s Rail Photos, a vast resource for information about hundreds of different railroads. This was not his only web site, as his interests ranged far afield.

I have not found an obituary for Mr. Ross. Nowadays, it doesn’t seem like everyone gets one. I don’t know what sort of provisions he made to continue his web site in the future, but it would be a shame if everything he worked so hard to create eventually disappears.

He will definitely be missed.

-David Sadowski

Our Annual Fundraiser

We are pleased to report we have exceeded our annual fundraising goal, with a total of $1055 received to date. These funds have already been put to good use, paying for our annual hosting fees, WordPress subscriptions, material for our next book, and for this blog.

We are very grateful to everyone who contributed. We could not continue this site without your kind assistance.

We accept donations 365 days a year. If you wish to help, there are links at the top and bottom of this page.

We thank you in advance for your time and consideration.

Photos by John V. Engleman

Silverliners at the Milwaukee terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Silverliners at the Milwaukee terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Silverliners at the Milwaukee terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Silverliners at the Milwaukee terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A great night shot of an Electroliner at Roosevelt Road in Chicago. This was the southern terminus for the North Shore Line for many years, and from 1949 to 1963 the interurban had this CTA station all to themselves. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A great night shot of an Electroliner at Roosevelt Road in Chicago. This was the southern terminus for the North Shore Line for many years, and from 1949 to 1963 the interurban had this CTA station all to themselves. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A rather blurry shot of an Electroliner at Roosevelt Road. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A rather blurry shot of an Electroliner at Roosevelt Road. (John V. Engleman Photo)

This is North Chicago. (John V. Engleman Photo)

This is North Chicago. (John V. Engleman Photo)

This is North Chicago. (John V. Engleman Photo)

This is North Chicago. (John V. Engleman Photo)

This has been identified as North Chicago. (John V. Engleman Photo)

This has been identified as North Chicago. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A stately Electroliner on a snowy day in Milwaukee. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A stately Electroliner on a snowy day in Milwaukee. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Roosevelt Road with car 255 in the pocket. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Roosevelt Road with car 255 in the pocket. (John V. Engleman Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9648 heads west, as seen from the Belmont "L" station. (John V. Engleman Photo)

CTA trolley bus 9648 heads west, as seen from the Belmont “L” station. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A great shot of an Electroliner at Roosevelt Road on a winter's day. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A great shot of an Electroliner at Roosevelt Road on a winter’s day. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Roosevelt Road. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Roosevelt Road. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Although this image was spoiled by a double exposure, it is still a nice view of the Milwaukee Terminal in winter. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Although this image was spoiled by a double exposure, it is still a nice view of the Milwaukee Terminal in winter. (John V. Engleman Photo)

An Electroliner at the Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

An Electroliner at the Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Here. we are looking north from the Belmont "L" station, and the platform at left was used only by southbound North Shore trains. As Graham Garfield's www.chicago-l.org website notes, "Beginning in 1919, North Shore Line interurban trains reached downtown Chicago over the North Side "L". Although the "L" and interurban services were separate and had different fares without free transfers, they shared a number of stops -- Belmont being one common stop -- with little effort to separate passengers. This was in large part because the North Shore Line and the "L" were both owned by common interests, led by Samuel Insull. This ended in 1947 when the CTA assumed ownership and operation of the "L", and thereafter the Authority was disinclined to allow free transfer of North Shore Line riders to the "L". Thus, from 1953 until the end of North Shore Line service in 1963, Belmont actually had three platforms: there was an additional very narrow North Shore Line exit-only platform built along the west side of the "L" structure, extending from the south side of Belmont Avenue to a point somewhat north of the ends of the center platforms. (Traffic-separation arrangements were also adopted at Howard and Wilson, but never at the other stations used by inbound North Shore trains.) Passengers could disembark on this platform only, and were deposited onto the sidewalk on Belmont. If they wanted to transfer to the "L", they had to reenter the station and pay another fare. Northbound North Shore Line trains continued to share the island platform used by "L" customers, although there was probably more boarding of the interurban northbound than alighting, and the North Shore Line had personnel aboard their trains to collect fares at all times." (John V. Engleman Photo)

Here. we are looking north from the Belmont “L” station, and the platform at left was used only by southbound North Shore trains.
As Graham Garfield’s http://www.chicago-l.org website notes, “Beginning in 1919, North Shore Line interurban trains reached downtown Chicago over the North Side “L”. Although the “L” and interurban services were separate and had different fares without free transfers, they shared a number of stops — Belmont being one common stop — with little effort to separate passengers. This was in large part because the North Shore Line and the “L” were both owned by common interests, led by Samuel Insull. This ended in 1947 when the CTA assumed ownership and operation of the “L”, and thereafter the Authority was disinclined to allow free transfer of North Shore Line riders to the “L”. Thus, from 1953 until the end of North Shore Line service in 1963, Belmont actually had three platforms: there was an additional very narrow North Shore Line exit-only platform built along the west side of the “L” structure, extending from the south side of Belmont Avenue to a point somewhat north of the ends of the center platforms. (Traffic-separation arrangements were also adopted at Howard and Wilson, but never at the other stations used by inbound North Shore trains.) Passengers could disembark on this platform only, and were deposited onto the sidewalk on Belmont. If they wanted to transfer to the “L”, they had to reenter the station and pay another fare. Northbound North Shore Line trains continued to share the island platform used by “L” customers, although there was probably more boarding of the interurban northbound than alighting, and the North Shore Line had personnel aboard their trains to collect fares at all times.” (John V. Engleman Photo)

NSL 771 and train are heading east at LaSalle and Van Buren on the Loop "L", making this a southbound train in the morning. (John V. Engleman Photo)

NSL 771 and train are heading east at LaSalle and Van Buren on the Loop “L”, making this a southbound train in the morning. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A Silverliner at the head of a train. Not sure of the location. (John V. Engleman Photo) Zach E. says this is 769 at Lake Bluff.

A Silverliner at the head of a train. Not sure of the location. (John V. Engleman Photo) Zach E. says this is 769 at Lake Bluff.

The Mundelein Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The Mundelein Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

NSL 743 is northbound on the 6th Street Viaduct. (John V. Engleman Photo)

NSL 743 is northbound on the 6th Street Viaduct. (John V. Engleman Photo)

North Shore Line Silverliners at the Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

North Shore Line Silverliners at the Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A southbound Silverliner at Belmont. (John V. Engleman Photo)

A southbound Silverliner at Belmont. (John V. Engleman Photo)

An Electroliner has arrived and its trolley pole hasn't yet been turned around. (John V. Engleman Photo)

An Electroliner has arrived and its trolley pole hasn’t yet been turned around. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Such a classic view of the Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Such a classic view of the Milwaukee Terminal.
(John V. Engleman Photo)

An Electroliner at the Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

An Electroliner at the Milwaukee Terminal. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The Milwaukee Terminal. This picture, at least, could have been taken in 1962, judging by the nearby billboard. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The Milwaukee Terminal. This picture, at least, could have been taken in 1962, judging by the nearby billboard. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Red Pullman 460 at South Shops, as part of the CTA historical collection, possibly after the end of streetcar service, which ended in 1958. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Red Pullman 460 at South Shops, as part of the CTA historical collection, possibly after the end of streetcar service, which ended in 1958. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Prewar PCC 4021 and red Pullman 460 were part of the CTA's historical collection when this picture was taken at South Shops, possibly around 1959. Both cars are now at the Illinois Railway Museum. (John V. Engleman Photo)

Prewar PCC 4021 and red Pullman 460 were part of the CTA’s historical collection when this picture was taken at South Shops, possibly around 1959. Both cars are now at the Illinois Railway Museum. (John V. Engleman Photo)

This was scanned from a copy negative of an Electroliner in action. (John V. Engleman Collection)

This was scanned from a copy negative of an Electroliner in action. (John V. Engleman Collection)

The CTA Skokie Swift opened in April 1964, and it's possible this picture was taken not long after that at Dempster Street in Skokie. (John V. Engleman Photo) Spence Ziegler adds, "The Skokie Swift Car at Dempster St was taken after June, 1965 as the former North Shore Line catenary towers north of Dempster St. are gone."

The CTA Skokie Swift opened in April 1964, and it’s possible this picture was taken not long after that at Dempster Street in Skokie. (John V. Engleman Photo) Spence Ziegler adds, “The Skokie Swift Car at Dempster St was taken after June, 1965 as the former North Shore Line catenary towers north of Dempster St. are gone.”

It's not entirely clear just when this picture was taken at DesPlaines Avenue on the Congress line, but my guess is 1960-61. There are some CTA single-car units visible, and the first of these were delivered in 1960. But in this and the other shot, I don't see the shops building, which was completed in 1962. We are looking west, with the old Forest Park gas holder in the distance. (John V. Engleman Photo)

It’s not entirely clear just when this picture was taken at DesPlaines Avenue on the Congress line, but my guess is 1960-61. There are some CTA single-car units visible, and the first of these were delivered in 1960. But in this and the other shot, I don’t see the shops building, which was completed in 1962. We are looking west, with the old Forest Park gas holder in the distance. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The yard at the DesPlaines Avenue terminal, circa 1960-61. (John V. Engleman Photo)

The yard at the DesPlaines Avenue terminal, circa 1960-61. (John V. Engleman Photo)

CTA 5002 at Kimball in Lawrence, most likely in June 1962 (based on the platform signage). (John V. Engleman Photo)

CTA 5002 at Kimball in Lawrence, most likely in June 1962 (based on the platform signage). (John V. Engleman Photo)

CSL PCC 4050 is at Madison and Austin, and appears to have some front-end damage. The motorman does not look too happy about having his picture taken. (John V. Engleman Collection)

CSL PCC 4050 is at Madison and Austin, and appears to have some front-end damage. The motorman does not look too happy about having his picture taken. (John V. Engleman Collection)

CTA PCC 4110 exits the Washington streetcar tunnel in the early 1950s, with a Chicago Motor Coach bus at left. We are looking west. (John V. Engleman Collection)

CTA PCC 4110 exits the Washington streetcar tunnel in the early 1950s, with a Chicago Motor Coach bus at left. We are looking west. (John V. Engleman Collection)

The same location today. Note the building on the left matches.

The same location today. Note the building on the left matches.

Recent Finds

This is a North Shore Line city streetcar in Milwaukee. The caption that came with this one said, "Last day run past North Shore depot." If so, this would be 1951.

This is a North Shore Line city streetcar in Milwaukee. The caption that came with this one said, “Last day run past North Shore depot.” If so, this would be 1951.

CTA wooden "L" cars 390 and 280 make a fantrip photo stop at Austin Boulevard on the Garfield Park line on April 14, 1957. This was a temporary station due to ongoing construction of the Congress Expressway in this area.

CTA wooden “L” cars 390 and 280 make a fantrip photo stop at Austin Boulevard on the Garfield Park line on April 14, 1957. This was a temporary station due to ongoing construction of the Congress Expressway in this area.

North Shore Line car 154 survived the abandonment, only to succumb to the ravages of neglect many years later. Here, we see it in Anderson, IN on July 16, 1965, where it was pulled around by a locomotive. It eventually went to a museum in Worthington, OH where it was allowed to deteriorate. Considered in too bad shape to restore, it was purchased by another museum in Michigan, stripped of usable parts for the restoration of a different (non-NSL) car in their collection, and its carcass was unceremoniously dumped in a field, where it is now offered to anyone in need of a spare room or chicken coop.

North Shore Line car 154 survived the abandonment, only to succumb to the ravages of neglect many years later. Here, we see it in Anderson, IN on July 16, 1965, where it was pulled around by a locomotive. It eventually went to a museum in Worthington, OH where it was allowed to deteriorate. Considered in too bad shape to restore, it was purchased by another museum in Michigan, stripped of usable parts for the restoration of a different (non-NSL) car in their collection, and its carcass was unceremoniously dumped in a field, where it is now offered to anyone in need of a spare room or chicken coop.

From 1922 to 1938, North Shore Line cars ran to the south side. Here, we see a fantrip train, headed up by Silverliner 409, at 61st Street on one of those latter-day fantrips prior to the 1963 abandonment.

From 1922 to 1938, North Shore Line cars ran to the south side. Here, we see a fantrip train, headed up by Silverliner 409, at 61st Street on one of those latter-day fantrips prior to the 1963 abandonment.

CTA red Pullman streetcar 208 appears to be signed for Route 9 - Ashland, which would make this a car headed east between Paulina and Ashland, where it will turn north. Streetcars were not permitted on boulevards, which meant they could not travel on Ashland between Lake Street and Roosevelt Road. Buses replaced streetcars on the Ashland and Lake routes in 1954. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

CTA red Pullman streetcar 208 appears to be signed for Route 9 – Ashland, which would make this a car headed east between Paulina and Ashland, where it will turn north. Streetcars were not permitted on boulevards, which meant they could not travel on Ashland between Lake Street and Roosevelt Road. Buses replaced streetcars on the Ashland and Lake routes in 1954. (William C. Hoffman Photo)

CTA PCC 7240, signed for 77th and Vincennes (South Shops). (William C. Hoffman Photo) Mike Franklin: "Car 7240 is e/b on 69th St at Morgan St." Our resident South Side expert M.E. adds: "This photo needs further explanation. For many years, the 69th and Ashland barn housed Western Avenue PCC cars. After that barn closed in the early 1950s, the only remaining carbarn for PCC cars on the south side was at 77th and Vincennes. The CTA left the trackage alive on 69th St. between Western and Wentworth for the sole purpose of moving Western Avenue PCCs back and forth. (Trackage along Wentworth and Vincennes was still in use by route 22.) The car in this photo is heading home to the 77th and Vincennes barn."

CTA PCC 7240, signed for 77th and Vincennes (South Shops). (William C. Hoffman Photo) Mike Franklin: “Car 7240 is e/b on 69th St at Morgan St.” Our resident South Side expert M.E. adds: “This photo needs further explanation. For many years, the 69th and Ashland barn housed Western Avenue PCC cars. After that barn closed in the early 1950s, the only remaining carbarn for PCC cars on the south side was at 77th and Vincennes. The CTA left the trackage alive on 69th St. between Western and Wentworth for the sole purpose of moving Western Avenue PCCs back and forth. (Trackage along Wentworth and Vincennes was still in use by route 22.) The car in this photo is heading home to the 77th and Vincennes barn.”

CTA PCC 7180 is northbound on Dearborn at Congress in the mid-1950s.

CTA PCC 7180 is northbound on Dearborn at Congress in the mid-1950s.

The Garfield Park "L" temporary trackage at street level in Van Bure Street at Damen Avenue, some time around 1954 as the Congress Expressway is still under construction nearby (but the old "L" structure has already been removed).

The Garfield Park “L” temporary trackage at street level in Van Bure Street at Damen Avenue, some time around 1954 as the Congress Expressway is still under construction nearby (but the old “L” structure has already been removed).

The same location. A Buick heads south on Damen while an eastbound Garfield Park train waits for the lights to change before crossing.

The same location. A Buick heads south on Damen while an eastbound Garfield Park train waits for the lights to change before crossing.

North Shore Line 742 and a Silverliner at the Milwaukee Terminal in the early-to-mid 1950s.

North Shore Line 742 and a Silverliner at the Milwaukee Terminal in the early-to-mid 1950s.

This CTA preliminary study, circa 1954-55, shows plans for the Congress-Douglas-Milwaukee route that went into service in 1958. Planning for the section west of Cicero was somewhat tentative and differed from what was eventually built. At this stage, Laramie Yard was to be retained, and connected to the Congress line via a flyover. Eventually, it was decided to move the yard to DesPlaines Avenue, but at the time the land was not owned by the CTA. A platform area on the map at Laramie was not a station, but intended for use adding and cutting cars. The Austin-Menard station would have been located east of Austin Boulevard. Instead, it was built west of there, with a secondary entrance at Lombard. Once it was decided to add a secondary entrance to the Oak Park Avenue station at East Avenue, it was no longer necessary to have a new station at Ridgeland (as a replacement for Gunderson, which was located on a side street). During construction of the Congress Expressway in Oak Park and Forest Park, there were eventually three different temporary track configurations used.

This CTA preliminary study, circa 1954-55, shows plans for the Congress-Douglas-Milwaukee route that went into service in 1958. Planning for the section west of Cicero was somewhat tentative and differed from what was eventually built. At this stage, Laramie Yard was to be retained, and connected to the Congress line via a flyover. Eventually, it was decided to move the yard to DesPlaines Avenue, but at the time the land was not owned by the CTA. A platform area on the map at Laramie was not a station, but intended for use adding and cutting cars. The Austin-Menard station would have been located east of Austin Boulevard. Instead, it was built west of there, with a secondary entrance at Lombard. Once it was decided to add a secondary entrance to the Oak Park Avenue station at East Avenue, it was no longer necessary to have a new station at Ridgeland (as a replacement for Gunderson, which was located on a side street). During construction of the Congress Expressway in Oak Park and Forest Park, there were eventually three different temporary track configurations used.

A northbound NSL two-car train stops at Dempster Street in Skokie on March 26, 1960.

A northbound NSL two-car train stops at Dempster Street in Skokie on March 26, 1960.

North Shore Line conventional cars and an Electroliner meet at Edison Court in Waukegan on August 31, 1957. (Stephen D. Maguire Photo)

North Shore Line conventional cars and an Electroliner meet at Edison Court in Waukegan on August 31, 1957. (Stephen D. Maguire Photo)

On June 19, 1953, a three-car Chicago Auror and Elgin train approaches the Halsted "L" station in the four-track Met main line. We are looking to the northeast. The cars are 52, 317, and 304. (Robert Selle Photo)

On June 19, 1953, a three-car Chicago Auror and Elgin train approaches the Halsted “L” station in the four-track Met main line. We are looking to the northeast. The cars are 52, 317, and 304. (Robert Selle Photo)

Chicago Aurora and Elgin wood car 139 at Wheaton Yards on May 30, 1952. Don's Rail Photos: "138 thru 141 were built by American Car in 1910. They were rebuilt for Elevated compatibility in 1919. They were also leased to the CA&E in 1936, returned to the CNS&M in 1945, and sold to the CA&E in 1946." Once the CA&E stopped running downtown via CTA tracks in September 1953, the former North Shore cars were no longer needed and were scrapped the following year. (Robert Selle Photo)

Chicago Aurora and Elgin wood car 139 at Wheaton Yards on May 30, 1952. Don’s Rail Photos: “138 thru 141 were built by American Car in 1910. They were rebuilt for Elevated compatibility in 1919. They were also leased to the CA&E in 1936, returned to the CNS&M in 1945, and sold to the CA&E in 1946.” Once the CA&E stopped running downtown via CTA tracks in September 1953, the former North Shore cars were no longer needed and were scrapped the following year. (Robert Selle Photo)

CA&E car 129 at the Wheaton Yards on May 30, 1952. Don's Rail Photos: "129 was built by Jewett Car in 1907. It was rebuilt in 1914 and leased to Chicago Aurora & Elgin and modified in 1936. It was returned to CNS&M in 1945 and sold to CA&E in 1946. It was scrapped in 1951." (Note- the scrapping date is in error.) (Robert Selle Photo)

CA&E car 129 at the Wheaton Yards on May 30, 1952. Don’s Rail Photos: “129 was built by Jewett Car in 1907. It was rebuilt in 1914 and leased to Chicago Aurora & Elgin and modified in 1936. It was returned to CNS&M in 1945 and sold to CA&E in 1946. It was scrapped in 1951.” (Note- the scrapping date is in error.) (Robert Selle Photo)

CA&E wood car 318 is outbound on the Batavia branch on July 14, 1954, about one block from the Batavia station, on its way to Batavia Junction. Parts of the Batavia branch were somewhat similar to the main line at the Illinois Railway Museum, which you can see in this photo by Robert Selle. As with the rest of the CA&E, passenger service continued until the abrupt mid-day abandonment on July 3, 1957.

CA&E wood car 318 is outbound on the Batavia branch on July 14, 1954, about one block from the Batavia station, on its way to Batavia Junction. Parts of the Batavia branch were somewhat similar to the main line at the Illinois Railway Museum, which you can see in this photo by Robert Selle. As with the rest of the CA&E, passenger service continued until the abrupt mid-day abandonment on July 3, 1957.

CA&E cars 406 and 456 meet to pick up and discharge passengers at the Cicero Avenue station on the Garfield Park "L" on August 22, 1953, just less than a month before the interurban cut back service to Forest Park. (Robert Selle Photo)

CA&E cars 406 and 456 meet to pick up and discharge passengers at the Cicero Avenue station on the Garfield Park “L” on August 22, 1953, just less than a month before the interurban cut back service to Forest Park. (Robert Selle Photo)

CA&E car 418 is east of Laramie Avenue on the Garfield Park "L" on February 15, 1953, giving an unusual view of the ramp leading from ground level to the Cicero Avenue station. The middle part of the negative was partially light struck, which could happen with paper-backed roll film. Photographer Robert Selle shot size 616 Kodak Verichrome Pan film. 616 used the same film as 116, resulting in a large negative, but used slightly different spools. Both types were discontinued in 1984, as no cameras had been manufactured using these sizes in decades. Verichrome was designed to give maximum exposure latitude, as it was often used in box cameras that had only one shutter speed. It was discontinued in 2002.