Historic Chicago Buses, Part Three

CTA trolley bus 374 at Montrose and Narrangansett in 1948, "Another New CTA Bus." (Railway Negative Exchange Photo)

CTA trolley bus 374 at Montrose and Narrangansett in 1948, “Another New CTA Bus.” (Railway Negative Exchange Photo)

We generally don’t feature buses on this blog, since our main interest is in streetcars, light rail, and electric rail transit. But we do get requests to post more bus photos, and we are fortunate to have some excellent ones to show you today, thanks to the incredible generosity of George Trapp. Mr. Trapp has been collecting these type of pictures for nearly the last 50 years, and we thank him for sharing them with us. Some of these pictures also have streetcars in them.

To see additional photos he has already shared with us, just type “George Trapp” into the search window at the top of this page. Several other posts should come up.

For the streetcar fans, we have also included several additional trolley pictures from our own collections, featuring the Chicago & West Towns Railways, Illinois Terminal Railroad, and its subsidiary the Chicago, Ottawa & Peoria.

As always, if you can help identify locations, or have interesting facts or reminiscences to add, don’t hesitate to drop us a line. You can leave comments on this post, or write us directly at:

thetrolleydodger@gmail.com

-David Sadowski

gh1


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Bill Robb: "Chicago City Railway 430 is a 1938 ACF H-13-S. These units lasted unit 1953-55."

Bill Robb: “Chicago City Railway 430 is a 1938 ACF H-13-S. These units lasted unit 1953-55.”

CSL buses 6515 and 6407 at South Shops. The destinations signs on 6515 do not match. George Trapp: "CSL bus 6515 built by GM model TD-4506 built in 1946 is newly delivered and photo most likely taken by CSL."

CSL buses 6515 and 6407 at South Shops. The destinations signs on 6515 do not match. George Trapp: “CSL bus 6515 built by GM model TD-4506 built in 1946 is newly delivered and photo most likely taken by CSL.”

Bill Robb: "Chicago City Railways 402 is a 1934 ACF H-13-S."

Bill Robb: “Chicago City Railways 402 is a 1934 ACF H-13-S.”

Andre Kristopans: "The Diversey TB shot is eb at Kimball. Large building across street still there." Trolley bus service on Diversey ended in 1955 once the route was consolidated with former Chicago Motor Coach route 134. Ray Piesciuk: "The Diversey TB route was extended to Harlem (actually a wye at Neva) on 06/19/1932." (Railway Negative Exchange Photo)

Andre Kristopans: “The Diversey TB shot is eb at Kimball. Large building across street still there.” Trolley bus service on Diversey ended in 1955 once the route was consolidated with former Chicago Motor Coach route 134. Ray Piesciuk: “The Diversey TB route was extended to Harlem (actually a wye at Neva) on 06/19/1932.” (Railway Negative Exchange Photo)

CSL bus 825, signed for Peterson. Bill Robb: "Calumet & South Chicago 825 is a 1939 White 805M which ran until a general purge of obsolete buses in 1949." Andre Kristopans: "Most likely turning from north on Catalpa to west on Hollywood. Loop at the time was Bryn Mawr-Catalpa-Hollywood-Broadway."

CSL bus 825, signed for Peterson. Bill Robb: “Calumet & South Chicago 825 is a 1939 White 805M which ran until a general purge of obsolete buses in 1949.” Andre Kristopans: “Most likely turning from north on Catalpa to west on Hollywood. Loop at the time was Bryn Mawr-Catalpa-Hollywood-Broadway.”

CSL bus 6520 on extension route 103A. The original version of this route operated between 1930 and 1941. (Railway Negative Exchange Photo)

CSL bus 6520 on extension route 103A. The original version of this route operated between 1930 and 1941. (Railway Negative Exchange Photo)

CTA trolley bus 465. (Railway Negative Exchange Photo)

CTA trolley bus 465. (Railway Negative Exchange Photo)

Another new trolley bus being delivered to Chicago by rail. (Railway Negative Exchange Photo) George Trapp: "New St. Louis trolley bus #411 on flatcar in a freight train in April of 1948 on Illinois Terminal, note catenary."

Another new trolley bus being delivered to Chicago by rail. (Railway Negative Exchange Photo) George Trapp: “New St. Louis trolley bus #411 on flatcar in a freight train in April of 1948 on Illinois Terminal, note catenary.”

CTA trolley buses 570 and 571 being delivered on Illinois Central flatcars.

CTA trolley buses 570 and 571 being delivered on Illinois Central flatcars.

North and Lamon was the approximate location of CTA North Avenue garage, so presumably that is where this picture of trolley bus 403 was taken. (Railway Negative Exchange Photo) George Trapp: "St. Louis trolley bus 403 is next to Pullman-Standard trolley bus 344 built at Worcester plant. Both delivered in 1948, St. Louis unit in March-April, Pullman in Nov.-Dec."

North and Lamon was the approximate location of CTA North Avenue garage, so presumably that is where this picture of trolley bus 403 was taken. (Railway Negative Exchange Photo) George Trapp: “St. Louis trolley bus 403 is next to Pullman-Standard trolley bus 344 built at Worcester plant. Both delivered in
1948, St. Louis unit in March-April, Pullman in Nov.-Dec.”

A St. Louis Car Company builder's photo of trolley bus 172. (Railway Negative Exchange Photo)

A St. Louis Car Company builder’s photo of trolley bus 172. (Railway Negative Exchange Photo)

CSL had an open-air trolleybus yard at Central and Avondale, adjacent to the Chicago & North Western. The Kennedy expressway now occupies this location. (Railway Negative Exchange Photo) Ray Piesciuk: "The open air TB yard at Central-Avondale shows two buses with poles that are not trolley buses. They are work motor buses BA-106 & BA-115 outfitted with sleet scraping poles." Another reader writes: "Note the "Marmon-Herrington" builder's plate on the front of the bus. When the buses were retired, there were no such builder's plates to be found under the advertising holders that had existed at that location for most of the lives of the coaches. "

CSL had an open-air trolleybus yard at Central and Avondale, adjacent to the Chicago & North Western. The Kennedy expressway now occupies this location. (Railway Negative Exchange Photo) Ray Piesciuk: “The open air TB yard at Central-Avondale shows two buses with poles that are not trolley buses. They are work motor buses BA-106 & BA-115 outfitted with sleet scraping poles.”
Another reader writes: “Note the “Marmon-Herrington” builder’s plate on the front of the bus. When the buses were retired, there were no such builder’s plates to be found under the advertising holders that had existed at that location for most of the lives of the coaches. “

Another view of the old Central and Avondale yard. (Railway Negative Exchange Photo)

Another view of the old Central and Avondale yard. (Railway Negative Exchange Photo)

Here is a 1940s map of the area around Central and Avondale on Chicago's northwest side, where the Surface Lines had a temporary open-air trolley bus yard parallel to the Chicago & North Western starting in 1943. It was replaced by the Forest Glen garage in 1955. This area is now occupied by the Kennedy expressway.

Here is a 1940s map of the area around Central and Avondale on Chicago’s northwest side, where the Surface Lines had a temporary open-air trolley bus yard parallel to the Chicago & North Western starting in 1943. It was replaced by the Forest Glen garage in 1955. This area is now occupied by the Kennedy expressway.

George Trapp: "CSL #3226 is at South end of South Damen streetcar line, bus 6805 is on the shuttle bus extension to 87th Street." (Railway Negative Exchange Photo)

George Trapp: “CSL #3226 is at South end of South Damen streetcar line, bus 6805 is on the shuttle bus extension to 87th Street.” (Railway Negative Exchange Photo)

CSL 6153 on a charter, eastbound at Washington and State. Meanwhile, a suburban bus bound for the Brookfield Zoo approaches. (Edward Frank, Jr. Photo) Andre Kristopans: "The Brookfield Zoo bus is Bluebird Coach Lines. Route was from downtown out Randolph, Ogden, 26th Desplaines, with most trips continuing out 31st, LaGrange, Ogden to Aurora."

CSL 6153 on a charter, eastbound at Washington and State. Meanwhile, a suburban bus bound for the Brookfield Zoo approaches. (Edward Frank, Jr. Photo) Andre Kristopans: “The Brookfield Zoo bus is Bluebird Coach Lines. Route was from downtown out Randolph, Ogden, 26th Desplaines, with most trips continuing out 31st, LaGrange, Ogden to Aurora.”

CSL 3189, northbound at State and Lake, on August 29, 1947. Note the Greyhound bus at right. (Thomas H, Desnoyers Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CSL 3189, northbound at State and Lake, on August 29, 1947. Note the Greyhound bus at right. (Thomas H, Desnoyers Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CSL Sedan 3332 southbound at Wabash and Roosevelt on September 27, 1947. Note the Greyhound bus at right. (Thomas H. Desnoyers Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive) Allen Breyer: "Also shows the old Union Bus Terminal behind the Greyhound."

CSL Sedan 3332 southbound at Wabash and Roosevelt on September 27, 1947. Note the Greyhound bus at right. (Thomas H. Desnoyers Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive) Allen Breyer: “Also shows the old Union Bus Terminal behind the Greyhound.”

CSL 5289 passes some CSL buses at 78th and Vincennes, looking NE. According to Don's Rail Photos, "5251 thru 5300 were built by Brill in 1906, #15365, for CCRy. They were brought up to higher standards in 1909." (Gordon Lloyd Photo) This CSL bus photo is not part of the Trapp collection. Chuck Amstein: "The South Shops building in the background is still there." Another reader notes, "The two Yellow Coach gas buses in the background were purchased by CSL and are painted in the pre-Mercury Green CSL motor bus colors of Red and Cream with Black Striping as found on CSL 3407 at the Illinois Railway Museum today."

CSL 5289 passes some CSL buses at 78th and Vincennes, looking NE. According to Don’s Rail Photos, “5251 thru 5300 were built by Brill in 1906, #15365, for CCRy. They were brought up to higher standards in 1909.” (Gordon Lloyd Photo) This CSL bus photo is not part of the Trapp collection. Chuck Amstein: “The South Shops building in the background is still there.”
Another reader notes, “The two Yellow Coach gas buses in the background were purchased by CSL and are painted in the pre-Mercury Green CSL motor bus colors of Red and Cream with Black Striping as found on CSL 3407 at the Illinois Railway Museum today.”

Chicago & West Towns Railways

FYI, we have also added these two pictures to our earlier post West Towns Streetcars in Black-and-White (August 4th).

C&WT 104 at the Harlem and Cermak car barn on April 3, 1948, less than two before the end of streetcar service. One of the replacement buses is at right. (C. Edward Hedstrom Photo)

C&WT 104 at the Harlem and Cermak car barn on April 3, 1948, less than two before the end of streetcar service. One of the replacement buses is at right. (C. Edward Hedstrom Photo)

C&WT line car 15, with its famous bent pole.The defect was apparently accidental, but it was certainly distinctive.

C&WT line car 15, with its famous bent pole.The defect was apparently accidental, but it was certainly distinctive.

Illinois Terminal Railroad

IT 273.

IT 273.

According to Don's Rail Photos, IT 104 "was built by American Car in 1917 as AG&StL 64. In 1926 it became StL&ARy 64 and in 1930 it became IT 104." This picture was taken in Granite City on August 14, 1956.

According to Don’s Rail Photos, IT 104 “was built by American Car in 1917 as AG&StL 64. In 1926 it became StL&ARy 64 and in 1930 it became IT 104.” This picture was taken in Granite City on August 14, 1956.

IT 284, decked in bunting, on what must have been the final revenue trip on this portion of the interurban in 1955. If anyone can identify the exact date or the location, please let me know. (Glenn L. Sticken Photo) You can see a picture of the same bunting applied to IT 277 at the Illinois Railway Museum in 2011 here: http://hickscarworks.blogspot.com/2011/04/illinois-terminal-society-meet.html

IT 284, decked in bunting, on what must have been the final revenue trip on this portion of the interurban in 1955. If anyone can identify the exact date or the location, please let me know. (Glenn L. Sticken Photo) You can see a picture of the same bunting applied to IT 277 at the Illinois Railway Museum in 2011 here:
http://hickscarworks.blogspot.com/2011/04/illinois-terminal-society-meet.html

IT double-end PCC 455 at speed in St. Louis on May 18, 1951.

IT double-end PCC 455 at speed in St. Louis on May 18, 1951.

Chicago, Ottawa & Peoria

Here are four rare photos of the CO&P. Since it was abandoned in 1934, photos are scarce. We previously posted a few more here.

CO&P freight motor 1523 at the Ottawa Shops in 1934, presumably around the time of abandonment.

CO&P freight motor 1523 at the Ottawa Shops in 1934, presumably around the time of abandonment.

CO&P express freight car 301 in November 1910.

CO&P express freight car 301 in November 1910.

CO&P first #60 at Depue in 1910, a product of the Danville Car Company.

CO&P first #60 at Depue in 1910, a product of the Danville Car Company.

CO&P #66 at the Ottawa Shops in 1934, presumably at the time of abandonment. It was built by St. Louis Car Company in 1924. Some cars in this series were rebuilt for use on the rest of the Illinois Terminal system, including IT 415 (former CO&P 64) which is now at the Illinois Railway Museum.

CO&P #66 at the Ottawa Shops in 1934, presumably at the time of abandonment. It was built by St. Louis Car Company in 1924. Some cars in this series were rebuilt for use on the rest of the Illinois Terminal system, including IT 415 (former CO&P 64) which is now at the Illinois Railway Museum.

Historic Chicago Buses

CTA Marmon-Harrington trolley bus 9620 at the Cicero/24th terminal on July 3, 1967. (Stephen M. Scalzo Photo)

CTA Marmon-Harrington trolley bus 9620 at the Cicero/24th terminal on July 3, 1967. (Stephen M. Scalzo Photo)

While our main interest is in electric transit (streetcars, light rail, rapid transit and interurbans), from time to time we get requests to show bus pictures. We don’t have many, but we figure it’s time to make good on our promise to show what we do have.

Buses have been an important part of Chicago’s transit scene since the 1920s, when the Chicago Motor Coach Company began using them.

Whether you call them trolley buses, trolley coaches, or trackless trolleys, rubber-tired buses with overhead wires were used in Chicago from 1930 to 1973 and were very popular. I have fond memories of riding them as a kid, since I lived near Grand, Fullerton, North Avenue and several other such northwest side routes.

Despite an internal CTA study that showed trolley buses were very profitable in the early 1950s, the agency gradually phased them out between 1959 and 1973. (You can read more about trolley buses here.)

They remain in use in half a dozen North American cities to this day.

It is not widely known, but the Illinois Railway Museum has an operating trolley bus line and actually has six Chicago trolley buses in its collection, in addition to some from other cities.

In our recent E-book Chicago’s PCC Streetcars: The Rest of the Story, available in our Online Store, we discuss how Chicago transitioned to an all-bus surface fleet.

From 1930 to 1947, the Chicago Surface Lines believed in “Balanced Transit,” where streetcars were best for the heaviest routes, trolley buses for the medium sized ones, and gas buses for the lightest routes. The 1937 “Green Book” study commissioned by the City of Chicago, following national trends, envisioned replacing about half of the streetcar system with buses. However, the report, mainly written by Philip Harrington, who became the first head of the Chicago Transit Board, governing body of the CTA, also said that in the future, it might be advantageous to replace all the streetcars with buses.

If not for World War II, Chicago might have undergone a more orderly transition to buses over a longer period of time. But the delays caused by wartime shortages and the Great Depression meant that much of CSL’s rolling stock was quite old by the end of the war.

There was a pent-up need for change, and it should therefore be no surprise that as soon as CTA was created in 1945, they pressed CSL and the bankruptcy courts that controlled it to order large numbers of buses in addition to the 600 PCCs that were purchased for the busiest lines. (You can view the original CSL/CTA delivery records for those 600 streetcars further on in this post.)

Although CTA did not take direct control until October 1, 1947, they felt they had been given a mandate to make transit improvements immediately. Therefore, they “stage managed” equipment orders and actually dictated on what routes the new equipment was used on.

During this period, many CSL routes received extensions to areas of the city that had been developed since the last streetcar lines were built. Express bus routes were also started.

Transit unification in Chicago finally became complete when the CTA purchased the assets of the Chicago Motor Coach Company, effective October 1, 1952. CMC was a privately owned bus operator whose routes mainly ran on Chicago’s boulevards and parks. By 1952, they had a fleet of about 600 buses.

The Motor Coach was profitable, while CTA during this period was losing money. CTA felt that CMC was skimming the profitable “cream” off the city’s surface routes, and they wanted desperately to buy them out.

As it happens, the CTA had to pay at least $1m more for Motor Coach than they had wanted to, since they were, after all, a profitable enterprise that was owned by a national company that did not really want to sell.

The CTA applied some “hardball” tactics in the run-up to the sale. They tried to stop accepting transfers from CMC buses, and since there was a fare differential, began collecting the difference between the lower CMC fare and the higher CTA fares when riders did transfer.

In addition, they began competing directly against CMC on the Austin Boulevard route. There was more of this to come, and CMC saw the handwriting on the wall and sold out. After all, they had never actually been operating under a franchise from the City of Chicago, while the CTA, the courts determined, had few constraints on what they could do.

Mayor Martin H. Kennelly made public statements that opposed the sale, although there is some evidence that he was in favor of it privately.

Immediately upon taking over Motor Coach, the CTA raised the fares on those routes so that they matched the CTA’s higher rate.

Perhaps not coincidentally, it was right at the time that the CTA announced their so-called “PCC Conversion Program,” whereby 570 of the 600 Postwar cars were eventually scrapped, and some of the parts recycled for use in new rapid transit cars.

At this point, the CTA had achieved a virtual monopoly on surface transit in Chicago, and no longer had to try and compete with the Motor Coach Company. Interestingly, CTA did not purchase the Motor Coach name, which is why it is now in use by a private operator.

-David Sadowski

PS- For more Chicago trolley bus pictures, check out Tom’s Trolleybus Pix.

CSL trolley buses at a storage yard at Central and Lexington. The Garfield Park “L” is at left.

CSL 6511 and other TDH 4506's in Garfield Park.

CSL 6511 and other TDH 4506’s in Garfield Park.

CSL 623 at the North and Cicero garage.

CSL 623 at the North and Cicero garage.

CSL 3405 at Archer and Rockwell.

CSL 3405 at Archer and Rockwell.

From the St. Petersburg Tram Collection web site:

The largest group of coaches ordered by CSL from a single builder was 3400-series White 798 buses, 297 units at total. First 40 were delivered in 1944-45 (allocated to CSL by Office of Defence Transportation). In 1946-1948 257 coaches of 3441-3697 series arrived, last 100 were ordered by Chicago Transit Authority and had some improvements, such as marker lights on the roof, brigher interiors with improved lighting. Coaches 3496-3697 were automatic transmission-equipped. The post-war Whites arrived in then new Mercury green and Croydon cream livery and the fleet was centralized at Archer for turns on the new 62X Archer Express service, CSL first limited-stop bus line, which made its debut on October 21, 1946 between the Loop and Midway Airport.

Trolley bus 395 on route 78 - Montrose.

Trolley bus 395 on route 78 – Montrose.

CSL 516, signed for route 57 - Laramie.

CSL 516, signed for route 57 – Laramie.

Chicago Motor Coach Company 63 on Michigan Avenue, in front of the Fine Arts building.

Chicago Motor Coach Company 63 on Michigan Avenue, in front of the Fine Arts building.

Chicago Motor Coach Company double decker bus 162.

Chicago Motor Coach Company double decker bus 162.

The cover illustration from a Surface Lines brochure printed in August 1947.

The cover illustration from a Surface Lines brochure printed in August 1947.

Postwar Chicago PCC Delivery Dates

Thanks to the generosity of Andre Kristopans, we now have copies of the original CSL/CTA records that give exact delivery dates for all 600 Postwar Chicago PCC streetcars. This information has been added to Chicago’s PCC Streetcars: The Rest of the Story:

CCI09082015_0001

CCI09082015

CCI09082015_0002

CCI09082015_0003

CCI09082015_0004

CCI09082015_0005

CCI09082015_0007

CCI09082015_0006

You can help us continue our original transit research by checking out the fine products in our Online Store. You can make a donation there as well.

As we have said before, “If you buy here, we will be here.”

We thank you for your support.

Chicago Motor Coach's routes as of 1943.

Chicago Motor Coach’s routes as of 1943.

More Chicago Streetcars

This 1935 CSL brochure shows experimental pre-PCC car 7001 and one of the 100 "Sedans," which were then only six years old.

This 1935 CSL brochure shows experimental pre-PCC car 7001 and one of the 100 “Sedans,” which were then only six years old.

We continue our celebration of Chicago streetcars with several more great and rarely seen pictures. We managed to find another picture showing track work at Clark and Van Buren in 1954, and we’ve added it to a previous post on that subject that we made back in February.

Since we know some of you are also bus fans, we’ve thrown in a couple pictures of Chicago’s trolley coaches. While we have managed to identify most of these locations, there are a few that still need to be identified. If you can help with more information, don’t hesitate to contact us, either via a comment, or to: thetrolleydodger@gmail.com

-The Editor

PS- If you enjoy seeing these classic photographs, we can use your help. Check out our online store, where you can purchase our compact discs and electronic books. Our latest, Chicago’s PCC Streetcars- The Rest of the Story, ships this week and contains more than 3,500 pages of useful material plus hundreds of photographs, plus track maps and essays.

You can also make a donation to The Trolley Dodger if you support our continuing original research. We thank everyone who has helped us.

When this was published in 1935, free transfers between Chicago's streetcars and the "L" were a new thing.

When this was published in 1935, free transfers between Chicago’s streetcars and the “L” were a new thing.

CTA streetcars 225 and 4406, in fantrip service, at Broadway and Ardmore on October 21, 1956., with 6000s on the "L" in the background.

CTA streetcars 225 and 4406, in fantrip service, at Broadway and Ardmore on October 21, 1956., with 6000s on the “L” in the background.

CTA streetcars 225 and 4406, in fantrip service, at Clark and 16th on October 21, 1956. By this time, streetcars were only being used on weekdays on the busy Clark-Wentworth line, so the fantrip cars did not really get in the way of the replacement bus service being offered by CTA.

CTA streetcars 225 and 4406, in fantrip service, at Clark and 16th on October 21, 1956. By this time, streetcars were only being used on weekdays on the busy Clark-Wentworth line, so the fantrip cars did not really get in the way of the replacement bus service being offered by CTA.

Here is another photo showing track work at Clark and Van Buren on July 17, 1954. We've added this to ten others we posted back in February. You can find that post at: https://thetrolleydodger.com/2015/02/12/track-work-clark-van-buren-1954/

Here is another photo showing track work at Clark and Van Buren on July 17, 1954. We’ve added this to ten others we posted back in February. You can find that post at: https://thetrolleydodger.com/2015/02/12/track-work-clark-van-buren-1954/

CTA 4309 prepares to leave the nicely landscaped Clark-Arthur loop and head south on route 22.

CTA 4309 prepares to leave the nicely landscaped Clark-Arthur loop and head south on route 22.

CTA 7009 and follower at the loop at 63rd Place and Narragansett.

CTA 7009 and follower at the loop at 63rd Place and Narragansett.

CTA 7015 at 63rd and Central Park.

CTA 7015 at 63rd and Central Park.

CTA 4031 on 63rd Street.

CTA 4031 on 63rd Street.

Jeff Wien writes, "CTA 4275 at Clark and Devon turning east onto Devon on route 36: Broadway-State."

Jeff Wien writes, “CTA 4275 at Clark and Devon turning east onto Devon on route 36: Broadway-State.”

CTA 7024 at the Central Park wye on the 63rd Street route.

CTA 7024 at the Central Park wye on the 63rd Street route.

Jeff Wien writes, "PCC 7165 is a route 49 Western pullout from Devon Station (Clark and Schreiber). Car is pulling off of Clark onto Devon to head west and south along Western to 79th St. In back of photo one can see the wall of the Ridge Theater that later became a part of the Clark-Devon Hardware Store."

Jeff Wien writes, “PCC 7165 is a route 49 Western pullout from Devon Station (Clark and Schreiber). Car is pulling off of Clark onto Devon to head west and south along Western to 79th St. In back of photo one can see the wall of the Ridge Theater that later became a part of the Clark-Devon Hardware Store.”

Jeff Wien writes,"CTA 7148: Clark-Devon looking north from just south of Devon: route 22."

Jeff Wien writes,”CTA 7148: Clark-Devon looking north from just south of Devon: route 22.”

CTA 7186 southbound on Western. Not sure of the exact location.

CTA 7186 southbound on Western. Not sure of the exact location.

CTA 4049 on that section of Cottage Grove that ran parallel to the Illinois Central electric suburban service (now Metra). The ad of the side of the PCC, advertising the Mickey Spillane film "The Long Wait," currently playing at the Woods Theater, dates this photo to between about May 19 and June 14, 1954.

CTA 4049 on that section of Cottage Grove that ran parallel to the Illinois Central electric suburban service (now Metra). The ad of the side of the PCC, advertising the Mickey Spillane film “The Long Wait,” currently playing at the Woods Theater, dates this photo to between about May 19 and June 14, 1954.

Cottage Grove near 98th as it looks today.  This is where the streetcar ran on private right of way.

Cottage Grove near 98th as it looks today. This is where the streetcar ran on private right of way.

CTA 4015 at Cottage Grove and 115th, the south end of the line.

CTA 4015 at Cottage Grove and 115th, the south end of the line.

115th and Cottage Grove today.

115th and Cottage Grove today.

Eastbound CTA 194 passes Wieboldt's department store, which was located at about 850 W. 63rd Street, on May 1, 1952.

Eastbound CTA 194 passes Wieboldt’s department store, which was located at about 850 W. 63rd Street, on May 1, 1952.

850 W. 63rd Street as it looks today.

850 W. 63rd Street as it looks today.

CTA 188 heads west on 63rd Place near Austin during the summer of 1952. By this time, red cars had replaced PCCs on 63rd.

CTA 188 heads west on 63rd Place near Austin during the summer of 1952. By this time, red cars had replaced PCCs on 63rd.

63rd Place and Austin today. We are facing west.

63rd Place and Austin today. We are facing west.

CSL 4051, with experimental door arrangement, leaves the Milwaukee-Imlay loop circa 1940-41. (Stephen D. Maguire Photo)

CSL 4051, with experimental door arrangement, leaves the Milwaukee-Imlay loop circa 1940-41. (Stephen D. Maguire Photo)

CTA 7057 turning onto Halsted from Waveland. (George Snyder Photo)

CTA 7057 turning onto Halsted from Waveland. (George Snyder Photo)

CTA trolley bus 470 heading eastbound at Lawrence and Western.

CTA trolley bus 470 heading eastbound at Lawrence and Western.

Lawrence and Western today.

Lawrence and Western today.

A CSL trolley coach, from a 1935 brochure.

A CSL trolley coach, from a 1935 brochure.

Our new E-book Chicago's PCC Streetcars - The Rest of the Story ships this week.

Our new E-book Chicago’s PCC Streetcars – The Rest of the Story ships this week.