More Historic Chicago Buses

A lineup of CSL trolley buses purchased in 1937 from Brill. The location probably Central and Avondale, now the site of the Kennedy expressway.

A lineup of CSL trolley buses purchased in 1937 from Brill. The location probably Central and Avondale, now the site of the Kennedy expressway.

We generally don’t feature buses on this blog, since our main interest is in streetcars, light rail, and electric rail transit. But we do get requests to post more bus photos, and we are fortunate to have some excellent ones to show you today, thanks to the incredible generosity of George Trapp. Mr. Trapp has been collecting these type of pictures for nearly the last 50 years, and we thank him for sharing them with us.

We featured some of Mr. Trapp’s PCC pictures in our last post, and there will be several more such posts to come in the near future. Watch this space for more great Chicago PCC pictures.

From 1930 to 1947, the Chicago Surface Lines had an operating philosophy called “Balanced Transit,” whereby streetcars were for the ehaviest lines, trolley buses for the medium-sized routes, and gas or diesel buses for the lightest lines. Trolley buses were first used on new routes that went into the northwest side of Chicago, which was then developing rapidly.

There had been a competition between CSL and the Chicago Motor Coach Company to see which firm would get these routes, and CSL won out. While it may be that their intention was to eventually convert trolley bus lines to streetcar once they had developed sufficient ridership, in actual practice, this never happened.

The Chicago Transit Authority took over from CSL on October 1, 1947, and converted some additional streetcar lines to trolley bus. But the last such vehicles were purchased circa 1951 and by 1959, one year after streetcar service ended in Chicago, began a gradual phase-out of trolley buses in Chicago. The last one ran in 1973.

A 1951 CTA consultant’s report, the full text of which is included in out E-book Chicago’s PCC Streetcars: The Rest of the Story (available in our Online Store), recommended that the agency not purchase any more electric vehicles, due to the cost of electric power purchased fro Commonwealth Edison. A 1954 study by CTA Board member Werner W. Schroeder (which is also included in our E-book) said that trolley buses were the most profitable vehicles used by the CTA, but explained this away by saying they were being used on the cream of the routes.

During the 1950s, CTA’s preferred type of surface vehicle was the propane-powered bus. Propane was very cheap for most of the decade, but by 1960 costs had risen to the point where there was no cost advantage over diesels. There were many operational problems with propane buses, which were underpowered, sluggish, and had difficulty maintaining schedules. There were also a few spectacular fires and explosions involving propane.

The propane vs. diesel debate prompted a rare public spat between Chicago Transit Board members, which was settled when the CTA began purchasing GM diesel buses in 1961. The heyday of the propane bus, once the CTA’s darling, proved to be much shorter and less successful than that of the trolley bus (aka trolley coach or trackless trolley), which was fast, quiet, efficient, and very popular with the riding public.

Trolley buses are still being used in a half dozen North American cities, more than 40 years after Chicago stopped using them. Today, the only electric buses on the CTA system are a couple of battery-powered ones recently put into use.

Most of today’s pictures feature buses purchased by the Chicago Surface Lines prior to the 1947 CTA takeover.

As always, if you have any interesting tidbits of information to share about the photos you see here, don’t hesitate to let us know, either by making a comment on this post, or by dropping us a line to:

thetrolleydodger@gmail.com

Thanks.

-David Sadowski

PS- Today (September 30th), The Trolley Dodger blog reaches another milestone with 75,000 page views, and has been read by over 22,000 individuals. We thank you for your continued support.

CTA trolley bus 116.

CTA trolley bus 116.

CSL 1602. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CSL 1602. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CSL 6518. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CSL 6518. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CTA 6615 and 6622.

CTA 6615 and 6622.

CTA 6410.

CTA 6410.

CTA 6830 - March 1951. (Chicago Transit Authority Photo)

CTA 6830 – March 1951. (Chicago Transit Authority Photo)

CSL 6410, a General Motors gas bus from the 6401-6410 series, on March 5, 1944.

CSL 6410, a General Motors gas bus from the 6401-6410 series, on March 5, 1944.

CSL 448. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CSL 448. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CTA 6206, a GM gas bus, built in 1942, in March 1951. The photo caption says that one bus in this series, #6306, was a diesel, used on 115th Street. Andre Kristopans adds, "In March 1951 CTA sent a photographer out to shoot exteriors and interiors of every bus and trolley bus series in the city. Most of the GM/Yellows were at Beverly Garage at the time. The 6200 photo caption is a bit incorrect. The 6201-6220 series were gas TG-3205’s, while the 6301-6306 were indeed diesels, TG-3605’s, one window and four seats longer." (Chicago Transit Authority Photo)

CTA 6206, a GM gas bus, built in 1942, in March 1951. The photo caption says that one bus in this series, #6306, was a diesel, used on 115th Street. Andre Kristopans adds, “In March 1951 CTA sent a photographer out to shoot exteriors and interiors of every bus and trolley bus series in the city. Most of the GM/Yellows were at Beverly Garage at the time. The 6200 photo caption is a bit incorrect. The 6201-6220 series were gas TG-3205’s, while the 6301-6306 were indeed diesels, TG-3605’s, one window and four seats longer.” (Chicago Transit Authority Photo)

CSL 3444. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CSL 3444. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

White-built CSL bus 3426 in 1945. (CSL Photo)

White-built CSL bus 3426 in 1945. (CSL Photo)

An ACF builder's photo of CSL 507. (Railway Negative Exchange)

An ACF builder’s photo of CSL 507. (Railway Negative Exchange)

CSL 506, an ACF gas bus, in 1935.

CSL 506, an ACF gas bus, in 1935.

CTA 9763, dubbed the "Queen Mary" by fans, was an experimental articulated bus that was converted to a trolley coach. It is now preserved at the Illinois Railway Museum. (Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CTA 9763, dubbed the “Queen Mary” by fans, was an experimental articulated bus that was converted to a trolley coach. It is now preserved at the Illinois Railway Museum. (Krambles-Peterson Archive)

A CTA trolley bus used on route 80 - Irving Park.

A CTA trolley bus used on route 80 – Irving Park.

CTA trolley bus 192, signed for route 72 - North Avenue.

CTA trolley bus 192, signed for route 72 – North Avenue.

CSL trolley bus 198.

CSL trolley bus 198.

CSL trolley bus 184. Interestingly, a sign on the front urges people to ride streetcars for short and long trips. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CSL trolley bus 184. Interestingly, a sign on the front urges people to ride streetcars for short and long trips. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CTA trolley bus 176, signed for route 77 - Belmont.

CTA trolley bus 176, signed for route 77 – Belmont.

CSL trolley bus 173, built by St. Louis Car Company in 1935, signed for route 86 - Narragansett. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CSL trolley bus 173, built by St. Louis Car Company in 1935, signed for route 86 – Narragansett. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CSL 177, signed for route 76 - Diversey. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CSL 177, signed for route 76 – Diversey. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CSL trolley bus 165 on route 76 - Diversey. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CSL trolley bus 165 on route 76 – Diversey. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

CSL trolley bus 106 on route 76 - Diversey on November 14, 1930. (Railway Negative Exchange)

CSL trolley bus 106 on route 76 – Diversey on November 14, 1930. (Railway Negative Exchange)

CSL trolley bus 80.

CSL trolley bus 80.

CSL trolley bus 116, signed for route 85 - Central Avenue.

CSL trolley bus 116, signed for route 85 – Central Avenue.

A 1931 CSL trolley bus equipped with a snow plow. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

A 1931 CSL trolley bus equipped with a snow plow. (CSL Photo, Krambles-Peterson Archive)

5 thoughts on “More Historic Chicago Buses

  1. CSL 507 13th picture from the top.
    Soon to join the CSL gas bus fleet, no. 507 poses for a builder’s photo on builder ACF’s turf in 1930s Philadelphia. The bus is parked on Cobbs Creek Parkway in southwest Philadelphia, except for more foliage this view remains unchanged today along with the stone bridge and the house on S. 65th St.

    Today Kawasaki built cars on the *Rt.13 Chester Ave. subway-surface line still use this bridge.

    *until 1956, Rt.13 Chester Ave. cars were routed into the center-city Philadelphia business district (downtown) traveling eastbound on Chestnut St., returning westbound on Walnut St. In 1956 PTC removed trolley routes 13 and 42 from the narrow Chestnut-Walnut one-way street pair, rt. 13 was re-routed via the new extension of the subway-surface tunnel joining the existing Market St. (1906) trolley tunnels into center-city, while rt 42 was converted to bus operation.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SEPTA_Subway-Surface_Trolley_Lines

    Like

  2. In March 1951 CTA sent a photographer out to shoot exteriors and interiors of every bus and trolley bus series in the city. Most of the GM/Yellows were at Beverly Garage at the time. The 6200 photo caption is a bit incorrect. The 6201-6220 series were gas TG-3205’s, while the 6301-6306 were indeed diesels, TG-3605’s, one window and four seats longer.

    Like

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